2016 Obits – September through December

jerry-hellerSeptember 2: Jerry Heller, 75: N.W.A.’s controversial original manager and music veteran died of a heart attack at Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Heller was in his mid-40s when he joined with Easy-E and the Ruthless Records label. But Heller’s efforts helped N.W.A. make hardcore hip-hop popular around the world. Outspoken, he sued the makers of the 2015 hit biopic Straight Outta Compton and was the subject of numerous dis songs and videos.

September 6: Darren Seals, 29: Ferguson activist, who protected the streets and sought justice for Michael Brown Jr.’s death died in North St. Louis County from a gun shot wound. He was a factory line worker and a hip-hop musician and became an activist following the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager who was fatally shot by a white Ferguson police officer.

September 7: Bobby Chacon, 64: world champion boxer (1974-1975, 1982-1983) from San Fernando Valley and suffered from the effects of brain damage, fell and struck his head in a Hemet care facility and succumbed to his injuries.

ladychablis-1473340985September 8: The Lady Chablis, 59: Savannah actress, who was best known for her role in Midnight in the Garden of Good & Evil, passed away surrounded by friends and family, from pneumonia. Lady Chablis was known as a premiere Savannah entertainer, one of Club One’s first.

September 11: Alexis Arquette, 47: transgender actress and activist, who was known for playing a Boy George inspired character in The Wedding Singer has died. She was a sibling of Patricia, Rosanna, David and Richmond Arquette. Cause of death has not been confirmed.

September 16: Edward Albee, 88: Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright who challenged theatrical convention in masterworks such as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Delicate Balance.

September 16: W.P. Kinsella, 81: Canadian novelist who blended magical realism and baseball in the book that became the smash hit film Field of Dreams.

September 16: Trisco Pearson, 53: R&B singer from the Force MDs, cancer.

September 16: Gabe Regard, 45: reality TV personality from Ax Men, did in a car crash.

September 17: Chairman Carr, 73: actress and singer who played Liesl in The Sound of Music and sang “I am 16 going on 17,” died from complications from dementia. She is survived by her sisters and brothers, her niece and her four grandchildren.

September 20: Curtis Hanson, 71: film director, screenwriter and Oscar winner (1998) for L.A. Confidential but also helmed such box-office hits like The Hand that Rocks the Cradle (1992) and Eminem’s 8 Mile (2002) died at his home in the Hollywood Hills. Paramedics had been called to the scene and found him. Friends stated that he had been battling a rare terminal condition for some time known as frontotemporal degeneration. Similar to Alzheimer’s, with its own set of symptoms and challenges.

September 21: George T. Odom, 66: actor (Straight Out of Brooklyn, The Hurricane, Law & Order), who also wrote scripts. He is survived by his sister, children, grandson and other family.

September 25: José Fernández, 24: Cuban-born American baseball player (Miami Marlins) was one of three men killed in a boating accident. None of them was wearing a life vest. Fernández died from trauma, not drowning.

kashif-copySeptember 25: Kashif, 59: producer, Whitney Houston collaborator and B.T. Express member died at his home of undetermined causes.

September 25: Arnold Palmer, 87: Golfing great who brought a country-club sport to the masses with a hard-charging style, charisma and a commoner’s touch.

September 26: Toughie: Panamanian frog, likely the last of his species (Rabbs fringe-limbed tree frog) died quietly in his enclosure at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens.

September 28: Chamsulvara Chamsulvarayev, 32: Russian-born Azeri freestyle wrestler and ISIS terrorist, killed in an air strike.

September 28: Gary Glasberg, 50: NCIS Showrunder and beloved executive producer on the most watched show in the world passed away in his sleep, suddenly. He was a married father of two and was juggling duties on NCIS and NCIS: New Orleans.

September 28: Shimon Peres, 93: Former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace.

September 30: George Barris, 94: the man who took the last photos of Marilyn Monroe on a beach in July of 1962, died at his home in Thousand Oaks, Calif. After he photographed Monroe, he moved to France after her death and remained there for two decades. In 1995, he published a book, Marilyn: Her Life in Her Own Words: Marilyn Monroe’s Revealing Last Words and Photographs, that featured his iconic photos. He claimed that they had been working on the book together. They had become friends after they met on the set of The Seven-Year Itch (1955).

cameron-mooreOctober 5: Cameron Moore, 25: basketball center (Reyer Venezia Mestre) was betrayed by his heart condition while training with first division team AV Ohrid from FYROM. He was diagnosed with cardiomegaly in 2015.

October 5: Josh Samman, 28: mixed martial arts fighter from Tallahassee died in South Florida. He had been hospitalized later in the week and was in a coma. He was moved to hospice, was breathing and had pulse. Police suspected it may have been a drug overdose.

October 5: Rod Temperton, 66: English keyboardist (Heatwave) and songwriter (Rock With You, Give Me the Night, Thriller) after a brief aggressive battle with cancer. Other hits included Off The Wall and Baby Be Mine for Jackson and Boogie Nights for his band, Heatwave.

October 12: Rick Gudex, 48: politician, member of the Wisconsin Senate (since 2013) died from a self-inflicted gun shot wound to the chest, stated the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner’s Office. His body was found around 1:30am in the Town of Eden. Toxicology rest results are pending.

quentin-grovesOctober 15: Quentin Groves, 32: football payer, Auburn career sacks leader and NFL defensive end/linebacker apparently died from a heart attack.

October 16: Jia Jia, 38: Chinese giant panda, the world’s largest, was euthanized at Hong Kong’s Ocean park. She had been losing interest in food and losing weight over the past few weeks.

michael-massee-24_0October 20: Michael Massee, 64: the prolific villain in countless television shows died of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He most recently appeared as a guest star across 12 episodes of 24’s first season in 2001 as Ira Gaines, a leader of a terror cell. I know him from his appearance in Rizzoli & Isles and Criminal Minds. He also appeared on Carnivale, Alias and Flashforward. Massee was the actor who pulled the trigger on a faulty prop gun that accidentally killed Brandon Lee during production of a scene on 1994’s The Crow.

October 22: Steve Dillon, 54: English comic book artist known for Preacher, The Punisher and Judge Dredd died in New York City from appendicitis.

October 25: Kevin Curran, 59: Emmy winner and longtime Simpsons writer who spent 15 year on the show died Tuesday at his home after a long illness. He is survived by a son and daughter that he had with his former partner, author Helen Fielding.

October 29: Norman Brokaw, 89: talent agent and influential William Morris leader who basically built the television department from scratch, died in Beverly Hills after a long illness. Some of his clients included Marilyn Monroe, Danny Thomas, Clint Eastwood, Bill Cosby, Loretta Young, Andy Griffith, Natalie Wood and more.

leonard-cohenNovember 7: Leonard Cohen, 82: Canadian singer-songwriter. His intensely personal lyrics explored themes of love, faith, death and philosophical longing made him a cult artist and whose song “Hallelujah” became a anthem recorded by hundreds of artists. He was a poet and a novelist before he stepped onto the stage as a performer in the 60s.

November 7: Janet Reno, 78: lawyer, politician, and the first woman to serve as U.S. Attorney General (1993-2001) died from complications of Parkinson’s disease. She was one of the Clinton administration’s most recognizable figures and faced criticism early in her tenure for the raid on the Branch Davidian compound at Waco, Texas. In the spring of 2000, she authorized the armed seizure of then 5-year-old Elian Gonzalez from the home of his relatives so he could be returned to Cuba with his father.

robert-vaughn-2-shotNovember 11: Robert Vaughn, 83: his Napoleon Solo on NBC’s The Man from U.N.C.L.E. set TV’s standard for suavity and crime busting cool died after a brief battle with acute leukemia. He died with his family around him.

November 13: Leon Russell, 74: Hall of Fame musician and songwriter, emerged in the 70s as one of rock ’n roll’s dynamic performers and songwriters after playing anonymously on dozens of pop hits as a much in-demand studio pianist in the 60s. He was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2011. He died in his sleep in Nashville, Tenn., his wife said in a statement on his website.

November 14: Gwen Ifill, 61: veteran journalist and newscaster who co-anchored PBS NewsHour and broke gender and racial barriers along the way died from endometrial cancer while covering this year’s presidential election.

mahpiya-skaNovember 14: Mahpiya Ska (White Cloud), 20: White Cloud, North Dakota’s iconic albino buffalo has died of old age. Genetic testing early in her life revealed that White Cloud was a true albino and also a genetically pure bison. Bison have a life expectancy of 20-25 years. Her white hair made it difficult for her to regulate her body temperature in the winter and summer and may have been a factor in her health problems.

November 14: David Mancuso, 72: DJ and pioneer of the NYC Underground Club Scene and the legendary “invite-only” parties, later known as The Loft. He pioneered the idea of underground private parties in New York in the early 70s as an alternative to the city’s commercial nightclub scene, which quickly took off and became a haven for exciting dance music in the city. A cause of death is unknown.

November 15: Lisa Lynn Masters, 52: actress who guest-starred in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Gossip Girl and Ugly Betty died while traveling in Peru. It is believed to be an apparent suicide by hanging.

November 17: Steve Triglia, 54: A British stuntman was killed in an abseil race from helicopter. According to The Sun, he fell 90m in China. Other details are not available. Ropes that were used had been left out overnight in heavy rain, making them potentially unsafe for the event. Triglia was well known for his work on James Bond and Mission Impossible films.

sharon-jonesNovember 18: Sharon Jones, 60: soul and funk revival band member of Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings passed away after a sustained battle with pancreatic cancer. She was surrounded by her loved ones, including the Dap-Kings. She was first diagnosed in 2013 and after surgery and some treatment, she went out touring with the band in 2014. But her cancer returned in November of 2015, two years after the release of the band’s album, Give the People What They Want. She was also the subject of a recent documentary, Miss Sharon Jones!, chronicling her first battle with cancer and her relationship with the Dap-Kings.

http://pitchfork.com/news/67585-sharon-jones-dead-at-60/

November 24: Florence Henderson, 84: born in Dale, IN, Florence Henderson career spanned six decades. She is best known for her role as matriarch Carol Brady on the ABC sitcom The Brady Bunch which ran from 1969 to 1974. She also hosted cooking and variety shows and was on Dancing with the Stars in 2010. She died of heart failure on Thanksgiving Day.

November 25: Fidel Castro, 90: He led his bearded rebels to victorious revolution in 1959, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of U.S. presidents during his half-century of rule in Cuba.

ron-glassNovember 25: Ron Glass, 71: he was the stylish and sassy NYPD detective on Barney Miller. He was an aspiring author. He was Shepherd Booth on the short-lived, cult favorite Firefly (as well as the movie Serenity), and his lengthy resume continues with voiceover work on Rugrats, Superman, Aladdin and The Proud Family. A spokesperson confirmed that he died of respiratory failure.

November 26: Fritz Weaver, 90: Tony-Winning character actor died at his home in Manhattan, confirmed my his son-in-law.

November 28: Jim Delligatti, 98: you probably don’t recognize his name, but there’s a “Big” chance you’ve eaten his invention. Jim Dellligatti’s McDonald’s franchise created the Big Mac nearly 50 years ago and saw it become the best-known fast-food sandwich in the world. He died at home in Pittsburgh. According to his son, Delligatti ate at least one Big Mac (540 calories) a week for decades.

November 28: Keo Woodford, 49: filmmaker and actor (Hawaii Five-0, Godzilla, Act of Valor) died from complications from a stroke.

November 28: Brazilian people killed in the crash of LaMia Flight 2933: Ailton Canela, 22; Dener Assunção Braz, 21; Sérgio Manoel Barbosa Santos, 27; Matheus Biteco, 21; Mateus Caramelo, 22; Ananias Eloi Castro Monteiro, 27; Victorino Chermont, 43 (reporter); Paulo Julio Clement, 51 (commentator); José Gildeixon Clemente de Paiva, 29; Guilherme Gimenez de Souza, 21; Lucas Gomes da Silva, 26; Josimar, 30; Caio Júnior, 51 (player and manager); Everton Kempes dos Santos Gonçalves, 34; Filipe Machado, 32; Arthur Maia, 24; Marcelo Augusto Mathias da Silva, 25; Delfim Peixoto, 75 (politician and football executive; vice-president of CBF, president of Federacão Catarinense de Futebol and congressman); Deva Pascovicci, 51 (announcer Fox Sports); Mário Sérgio Pontes de Paiva, 66 (football player, manager and commentator Fox Sports); Bruno Rangel, 34; Tiaga da Rocha Vieira, 22; Cléber Santana, 35; Thiego, 30; Marcos Danilo Padiha, 31 (died on November 29 from injuries)

December 1: Joe McKnight, 28: former USC running back was shot and killed following a road rage altercation just outside New Orleans in Terrytown, Louisiana. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The shooter, 54-year old Ronald Gasser, remained at the scene and was arrested.

December 5: Big Syke (Tyruss Himes), 41: rapper and Tupac collaborator, apparently died of natural causes. Big Syke was found dead in his home in Hawthorne, Calif., according to law enforcement sources. No foul play is suspected.

December 5: Rahsaan Salaam, 42: former Chicago Bears football player and Heisman trophy winner (1994) was found dead at a park in Boulder, Colo. Police have determined that there were no signs of foul play. His mother told USA Today that “they found a note” and police told her it was a suspected suicide.

cindy-stowellDecember 5: Cindy Stowell, 51: Jeopardy! contestant Cindy Stowell never saw herself on Jeopardy!. She was fighting Stage 4 colon cancer when she recorded episodes in August and September, competing on painkillers and fighting off a fever that caused makeup artists to rush onstage to clean up her sweat. She died just over a week before her taped episodes began showing. But once the world saw her compete and heard her story, she inspired fans unlike anyone in the quiz shows’s 33-year history. Before dying she pledged her more than $100,000 in winnings to the Cancer Research Institute.

December 6: Peter Vaughan, 93: He played Maester Aemon for 5 years in the HBO series, Game of Thrones. He had many other roles in British TV shows including Citizen Smith, Chancer and Our Friends in the North. He died peacefully with his family around him.

lake-center-elpDecember 7: Greg Lake, 69: English singer, musician and front man for both King Crimson and Emerson, Lake & Palmer died after a “long and stubborn battle with cancer,” said his manager. His band-mate, Keith Emerson died nine months earlier of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

December 8: John Glenn, 95: His 1962 flight as the first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth made him an all-American hero and propelled him to a long career in the U.S. Senate.

December 10: Eric Michael Hilton, 83: founded Three Square food bank almost a decade ago when he discovered that Clark County, Nevada would soon be without a food bank. The youngest son of Hilton Hotels Corp. founder Conrad Hilton, Texas native Eric Hilton began working for his father’s company in 1949 and was promoted several times before retiring as vice chairman emeritus in 1997. He lived in many places, including Las Vegas, before becoming a full-time valley resident in 2013. He died in his sleep at his Las Vegas home.

December 11: Bob Kkrasnow, 82: record label executive of Electra Records and co-founder of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

December 12: Konrad Neuland, 29: former tight end with the Baltimore Ravens died following a brain aneurysm. He had emergency surgery two weeks earlier in hopes of rectifying the issue, but succumbed and died. 

colburnDecember 13: Lawrence Manley Colburn, 67: he was the helicopter gunner in the Vietnam War who helped end the slaughter of hundreds of unarmed Vietnamese villagers by U.S. troops at My Lai. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace prize in 2001 for his actions and received the Soldier’s Medal, the highest U.S. military award for bravery not involving conflict with the enemy.His wife said her husband was diagnosed with cancer in late September and it took his life.

December 13: Alan Thicke, 69: sit-com actor, talk show host, reality TV star, composter, author. Alan Thicke didn’t just wait around for the phone to ring. He gained his greatest renown as the beloved dad on the sitcom Growing Pains. He died of a ruptured aorta.

December 15: Craig Sager, 65: Sager sported suits in every color of the rainbow and beyond. But he was better known for his probing questions when covering the Olympics, Major League Baseball playoffs, the NFL and NCAA tournaments. But he loved the NBA and worked games for TNT for nearly a quarter-century. He had leukemia.

December 17: Henry Heimlich, 96: Surgeon who created the life-saving Heimlich maneuver for choking victims. Complications from a heart attack.

December 18: Zsa Zsa Gabor, 99: a social butterfly well before there was social media. She was well known more for beauty and glamour than acting and was a regular on TV talk shows and for her nine marriages. She died at her Bel Air home from a heart attack.

December 19: Andrei Karlov, 62: Russian diplomat and Ambassador to Turkey (since 2013), he was shot dead in Ankara by a Turkish policeman, apparently in protest of Russia’s involvement in Aleppo.

red-solo-cupDecember 21: Robert Leo Hulseman, 84: the man who launched hundreds of thousands of keg parties died in Northfield, Illinois, surrounded by his family. Hulseman is credited with inventing the Red Solo Cup in the 70s. His father, Leo, founded the Solo Cup Company in the 1930s. Part of the popularity of the cup is its inside rings which mark 1.5 ounces for liquor, 5 ounces for wine and 12 ounces for beer. Though it’s not clear why the cup was made bright red, the Solo Cup brand manager, Rebecca Bikoff told “Vice” in June ‘It makes sense that consumers would gravitate to this color when you think about the kind of occasions it’s used at.’ Hulseman began working at his father’s company at 18 in various roles until it was a $1.6 billion a year in revenue.

george-michaelDecember 25: George Michael, 53: he rose to fame as part of the 80s pop duo Wham and went on to sell more than 100 million albums in a career that spanned four decades. He was a songwriter (Careless Whisper, Last Christmas, Faith). He died at his home of suspected heart failure.

December 27: Carrie Fisher, 60: known best for playing Princess Leia in the Star Wars films, Carrie Fisher was also a novelist and a screenwriter. Her son, Billie Lourd, confirmed that his mother passed away at approximately 9am in morning on the 27th. Her mother, the iconic Debbie Reynolds wrote on Facebook, “Thank you to everyone who has embraced the gifts and talents of my beloved and amazing carrie-fisherdaughter.” Fisher suffered a heart attack last week aboard a Los Angeles-bound flight 15 minutes prior to landing. A medic on board performed CPR until paramedics arrived and she was transferred to UCLA Medical Center where she was immediately placed on a ventilator. George Lucas said, “In Star Wars, she was our great and powerful princess — feisty, wise and full of hope in a role that was more difficult than most people might think.” Harrison Ford, who played alongside Fisher added: “Carrie was one-of-a-kind, brilliant, original. Funny and emotionally fearless. She lived her life, bravely.” Mark Hamill tweeted: no words #Devastated and included a picture of himself as Luke Skywalker and Fisher as Princess Leia. I think Billie Dee Williams said it best, “The force is dark today!”

la-me-debbie-reynoldsDecember 28: Debbie Reynolds 84: she was a triple threat: she sang, she danced, she acted. And her death was tragic, coming one day after her daughter, Carrie Fisher. It’s reported that she said she wanted to “see her again” and within 30 minutes she suffered a stroke and died. Reynolds’ son, Todd, told the media that his mother was under stress over the death of her daughter and suffered that stroke at her home around noon. To read more about the lifetime of Debbie Reynolds, here’s the link to her obit in the LA Times:

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-me-debbie-reynolds-20161228-story.html

December 28: Pan Pan, 31: world’s oldest male giant panda, who would have been 100 in human years, passed away.

December 29: Keion Carpenter, 39: football player (Buffalo Bills, Atlanta Falcons) and former Woodlawn High School, died from injuries sustained from a fall.

sutter-brownDecember 30: “It took a dog to humanize the Capitol,” said Jennifer Fearing, a lobbyist for animal rights issues who was one of Sutter Brown’s unofficial caretakers in Sacramento. Sutter was the charismatic corgi who seemed to soften the rough edges of Gov. Jerry Brown. In the process, he became a social media sensation. He died after an illness that sparked a bipartisan outpouring of support.

william-christopherDecember 31: William Christopher, 84: the actor best known for play Father John Mulcahy on the hit TV show M.A.S.H. died, according to his family. His son said he died from non-small cell lung cancer at his home in Pasadena.

Why Do We Mourn Celebrities?

This morning while I was making my bed and watching Good Morning America, I heard that Debbie Reynolds died. I was blown away. Just one day after she lost her daughter, Carrie Fisher, apparently she suffered a stroke while making funeral arrangements. The mystery of death.

The panel went on to discuss a newsweek.com article about why we mourn celebrity deaths, so I looked it up. It was written April 22, 2016 and explained quite a bit of why we mourn rock stars, celebrities and other famous people who die.

According to the article, nostalgia is a kind of pain, an acute longing for the familiar. That explains why when Prince, David Bowie and George Michael passed away, we tend to download or stream their music and recall what we were doing when we first heard those particular songs.

Apparently George Michael’s music downloads have increased by 1600% since his death.

The article goes on to say that “we’re not very well served by our culture because it tends to keep the genuine tragedy of death at bay.”

Instead of mourning at funerals, we hold celebrations. This is a time to mourn and that’s being denied. It offered some advice.

Wisdom based traditions advise practicing mourning. Socrates said that philosophy is “learning to die.” Buddhists meditate before skeletons. Christians keep Good Friday. And it’s good advice.

http://www.newsweek.com/why-do-we-mourn-celebrity-deaths-451393

 

2016 Obits – May through August

71824088AB025_tupacMay 2: Afeni Shakur Davis, 69: Tupac Shakur’s mother, died in Marin County, Calif. of possible cardia arrest, though a confirmed cause of death has not been reported. (Annette Brown/Getty Images)

May 4: Blas Avena, 32: Las Vegas Police are investigating the death of this mixed martial art fighter as a suicide. He was found in his apartment and was pronounced deceased at the scene by arriving police and medical personnel. He had an 8-7 record  that began in 2005. He last appeared at Bellator 96 on June 19, 2013.

May 5: Matt Irwin, 36: celebrity and fashion photographer who captured Taylor Swift, Rihanna, One Direction, Kesha and Nicki Minaj, among others, died unexpectedly. Irwin (courtesy of Camilla Lowther Management)

May 8: William Schallert, 93: Schallert’s career spanned generations and genres. He played the long-suffering father and uncle to the “identical cousins” played by Patty Duke on The Patty Duke Show and earned a permanent place in the hearts of Star Trek fans in 1967 when he played the under secretary in charge of agricultural affairs for the United Federation of Planets in “The Trouble With Tribbles.” That episode is often cited by fans and critics as one of the best episodes of the original Star Trek series. Though never a leading man, Schallert was the embodiment of the supporting, working actor. Schallert’s son Edwin confirmed his death.

May 10: Sally Brampton, 60: fashion editor, author, columnist – the woman who made ‘Elle girls’ the new normal, who had written eloquently about her dark period of depression, took her own life close to her home in St Leonards-on-Sea. She once wrote, “We don’t kill ourselves. We are simply defeated by the long, hard struggle to stay alive.”

May 13: Bill Backer, 89: advertising executive who penned the song “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing (Coca-Cola) and was recently featured in the finale of Mad Men died in Warrenton, Va. His wife and only survivor confirmed his death.

May 17: Guy Clark, 74: Texas native and grammy-winning songwriter died after a long illness according to a statement from his publicist.

Obit Morley SaferMay 19: Morley Safter, 84: CBS News legend, who work on 60 Minutes embodied the show’s 50 years on air, died of pneumonia, according to CBS. Safer exposed a military atrocity in Vietnam that played an early role in changing American’s view of the war. He once claimed  “there is no such thing as the common man; if there were, there would be no need for journalists.”

May 19: Alan Young, 96: known for his role as Wilbur Post in the TV show Mr. Ed.

May 21: Nick Menza, 51: died after he collapsed on stage during a show with his current band, Ohm. Menza played on many of Megadeth’s most successful albums. He allegedly died of heart failure.

May 27: Marshall “Rock” Jones, 75: bass player (Ohio Players).

May 27: Hanako, 69: an aged Japanese elephant, whose living conditions sparked protests earlier this year died, said zoo officials. She was the country’s oldest elephant. She was found lying on the floor of her enclosure, unable to stand.

May 28: Harambe, 17: American-bred Western lowland gorilla, shot at the Cincinnati zoo to save a child who slipped into his enclosure.  It carried the boy around its habitat for about 10 minutes in what the zoo’s dangerous animal response team considered a life-threatening situation, said the Zoo Director, at a press briefing.

May 28: Floyd Robinson, 83: American country singer.

June 1: Roger Enrico, 71: American businessman (PepsiCo, Dreamworks).

aliJune 3: Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay), 74: called himself “The Greatest”, three-time WBC world heavyweight boxing champion who could float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. Fans on every continent adored him and at one point, he was probably the most recognizable man on the planet. Ali died of septic shock after spending five days at an Arizona hospital for what seemed to be respiratory problems but eventually worsened. His wife and children were called to his bedside to say goodbye. More details came as Ali’s family revealed plans for his funeral in his hometown of Louisville, KY. Ali suffered for more than three decades from Parkinson’s disease and had survived several death scares in recent years.

June 6: Kimbo Slice (The Truth), 42: Bahamian-born, American mixed martial artist, (Bellator, UFC) boxer and actor. He was rushed to the hospital on June 3 after suffering congestive heart failure and a liver mass. He was diagnosed with heart failure and placed on a ventilator. He died at 7:30pm while being prepared for transfer to a facility in Cleveland.

GTV ARCHIVEJune 6: Theresa Saldana, 61: she played the wife of Joey La Motta (Joe Pesci) in Raging Bull and she played the wife of The Commish. But her most lasting legacy will be her victims’ advocacy work she undertook when she survived an almost fatal stalking incident in 1982. A Brooklyn native, Saldana had appeared in a number of films in the late 70s and early 80s. In March, 1982 she was stabbed several times outside her West Hollywood home by a mentally disturbed stalker. She barely survived. This was two years after the assassination of John Lennon and seven years before the murder of Rebecca Schaeffer. But she resumed her acting career and provided a face and a voice to the new issue of celebrity stalking.

June 10: Gordie Howe, 88: (left in pic) scored 801 goals in his NHL career and won 4 Stanley Cups with the Detroit Red Wings. He was known at Mr. Hockey.

June 10: Christina Grimmie, 22: was murdered by a fan while signing autographs after a concert in Orlando. Grimmie finished third on Season 6 of The Voice on NBC. The suspect, Kevin James Loibl, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at the scene. A friend of Loibl said his friend had developed a fixation on her within the last year.

June 11: Stacey Castor, 48: convicted murderer who poisoned her husband with antifreeze and attempted to kill her daughter in a similar way, is dead in prison, according to County DA William Fitzpatrick. Castor was serving a 50+ years-to-life in the state women’s prison, Bedford Hills, in Westchester County. She would have been eligible for in 2055.

June 12: Michu Meszaros, 77: The actor who played Alf in the popular ’80s sitcom died according his longtime friend and manager, Dennis Varga.

June 17: Ron Lester, 45: he portrayed Billy Bob in the 1999 football movie Varsity Blues and openly talked about his struggle with his illness on Twitter. Lester died of organ failure (liver and kidneys).

June 17: Attrell Cordes, 46: known as Prince Be of the music duo P.M. Dawn, died after suffering from diabetes and renal kidney disease, according to a statement from the group.

Terminator SalvationJune 19: Anton Yelchin, 27: he played Pavel Chekov in the reboot of the Star Trek movies and was one of most gifted and talented young actors of today. He was killed in a freak car accident outside his home, police said, by a 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee that was part of a voluntary safety recall for its roll-away risk after drivers were injured when they mistakenly thought they had shifted their car into park. In this instance, the Jeep rolled backward and pinned him against a brick mailbox pillar and security fence.

June 23: Ralph Stanley, 89: he was a bluegrass music pioneer and was already famous when the 2000 hit movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? thrust him into the mainstream. He provided a haunting a cappella version of the dirge “O Death” and ended up winning a Grammy.

June 24: James Lee, 36: football player and former 2004 Green Bay Packer, complications from diabetes.

June 24: Bernie Worrell, 72: Parliament-Funkadelic Keyboardist and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee died following a battle with cancer.

June 25: Bill Cunningham, 87: he was a street-life photographer; a cultural anthropologist; a fixture at fashion shows; a celebrity in spite of keeping his camera focused on others and one of the most recognizable figures at The New York Times and in all of New York.

June 25: Elliot Wolff, 61: songwriter and music producer, Wolff was missing more than 2 weeks when police in New Mexico found his body in the Santa Fe National Forest. He was positively identified by items found on his clothes. He was reported missing on June 7. He began his career working as a musical director for Peaches and Herb in the early 80s, and played keyboards for Chaka Khan before moving to Los Angeles to pursue a career as a songwriter, which included writing and producing Paula Abdul’s 1988 No. 1 song “Straight Up.”

June 28: Scotty Moore, 84: legendary guitarist credited with launching Elvis Presley’s career and a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. He was ranked #29 in Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 greatest guitarists.

June 28: Fabiane Niclotti, 31: Brazilian model, Miss Universe Brasil, 2004, was found dead inside her apartment in the southern city of Gramado.

June 28: Pat Summitt, 64: she built the University of Tennessee’s Lady Volunteers into a power on the way to becoming the winningest coach in the history of major college basketball. She died five years after she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

June 28: Zurlon Tipton, 26: a former Indianapolis Colts running back died from a shooting at a Michigan car dealership after a gun in his car was accidentally discharged.

July 2: Jack Taylor, 94; started a leasing company with seven cars and built it into Enterprise Rent-A, died in St. Louis after a brief illness.

July 2: Elie Wiesel, 87: Romanian-born Holocaust survivor whose classic “Night” became a landmark testament to the Nazis’ crimes and launched his career as one of the world’s foremost witnesses and humanitarian.

July 2: Michael Cimino, 77: Oscar-winning director whose film The Deer Hunter became one of the great triumphs of Hollywood’s 1970s heyday and whose disastrous Heaven’s Gate helped bring that era to a close.

arturroJuly 3: Arturo, 31: American-born Argentine polar bear was said to suffer from depression after his partner, Pelusa, died of cancer in 2012. He came to the world’s attention two years ago when thousands of people signed a petition asking for him to be transferred to a colder climate in Canada. A blood circulation imbalance caused a general decline in his health.

July 3: Noel Neill, 95: played Lois Lane in the 1950’s TV version of Superman.

July 8: Goldie Michelson, 113: Russian-born American supercentenarian, nation’s oldest living person died just short of celebrating her 114 birthday (August). Born in Russia, she moved to the US as a child and attended Brown University for her undergraduate degree and earned a master’s degree at Clark University. She lived an active life, walking 4-5 miles every morning, which she called her “secret to longevity.” She didn’t smoke or drink, but she did have a weakness for chocolate.

July 9: Gladys Hooper, 113: English supercentenarian, nation’s oldest living person, passed away at the nursing home where she was a resident, at lunchtime. She was a former concert pianist, the same year the Wright brothers made the first powered aircraft flight (1903).

July 9: Sydney H. Schanberg, 82: Former New York Times correspondent awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the genocide in Cambodia in 1975 and whose story of the survival of his assistant inspired the film The Killing Fields.

July 14: Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel, 31: Tunisian jihadist, perpetrator of the 2016 Nice attack was a Tunisian delivery man, not a known jihadist. Apparently he had been radicalized very quickly. The so-called Islamic State (IS) says he acted in response to its calls to target its calls to target civilians in countries that are part of the coalition ranged against the group. He surveyed the area in the truck two days before the July 14 Bastille Day attack, then smashed into the crowd killing 86 people on Nice’s beachfront, the Promenade des Anglais.

July 16: Bonnie Brown, 77: A 2015 Country Music Hall of Famer died of complications from lung cancer.

July 18: Jeffrey Montgomery, 63: American LGBT rights activist and longtime Executive Director for Triangle Foundation died in Detroit, Mich.

Warner Bros. Pictures World Premiere Of 'Valentine's Day'  Hollywood Los Angeles, America.July 19: Garry Marshall, 81: director, producer, writer and actor; the man who created some the 70s most iconic sitcoms including Happy Days, The Odd Couple, Laverne and Shirley died in Burbank, Calif. of complications from pneumonia following a stroke. He went from being a TV writer to creating sitcoms that touched the funny bones of the 70s generation and directing films that were watched again and again. He is survived by his wife Barbara, whom he married in 1963; his son Scott, a film director; and daughters Lori, an actress and casting director, and Kathleen, and actress; six grandchildren; and his sisters Penny Marshall, an actress and film director and Ronny Hallin, a TV producer.

July 24: Marni Nixon, 86: Hollywood voice double whose singing was heard in place of the leading actresses’ in such movie musicals as West Side Story, The King and I and My Fair Lady.

July 26: Forrest Mars, Jr., 84: a Mars, Inc. co-owner who oversaw the global expansion for M&Ms and Milky Way candies and helped his two siblings run the closely held company for 30 years died in Seattle. The cause was a heart attack. He was the grandson of Forrest E. Mars, who made the first Mars products in 1911, helped his younger brother and sister run the company and drive it into new markets such as Russia, Poland and the Czech Republic in 1991 and opened its first manufacturing plant in China two years later, according to the company’s website.

July 26: Miss Cleo (Youree Dell Harris), 53: Iconic TV Psychic, who rose to fame in the late 1990s through psychic hotline commercials in which she claimed to know the futures of her callers, died of cancer in Palm Beach, Florida.

July 29: Antonio Armstrong, 42: former Texas A&M star and NFL player died after being shot by his 16-year old son at their home in the Houston-area city of Bellaire. He was found injured in the bedroom and taken to the Memorial Hermann Hospital where he later died. Armstrong’s wife, Dawn, was also involved in the shooting and died at the home. No motive has yet been found.

gloria-dehavenJuly 30: Gloria DeHaven, 91: singer and actress, a studio player at MGM, appeared in a number of top films with leading stars: Thousands Cheer (Gene Kelly); Two Girls & a Sailor (June Allyson & Van Johnson); Step Lively (Frank Sinatra); Summer Holiday (Mickey Rooney) and many more. She was a stalwart of show business for more than six decades. She suffered a stroke about 3 months ago, her daughter, Faith Fincher-Finkelstein told The Hollywood Reporter. She died while in hospice care in Las Vegas, Nevada.

August 3: Ricci James Martin, 62: the youngest son of music legend Dean Martin and a musician and entertainer in his own right died in his home in Utah, his family made the news public, listing no cause of death. Ricci had been performing in a touring tribute to his father.

August 3: Shakira Martin, 30: American-born Jamaican model and Miss Jamaica Universe, died in a Florida hospital from complications from sickle cell disease.

August 5: Joellyn Duesberry, 72: American landscape artist, pancreatic cancer.

joani-blankAugust 6: Joani Blank, 79: American entrepreneur (Good Vibrations), Butterfly vibrator inventor, author and feminist sex educator. Joani Blank made the world safe for pleasure-seeking women. She founded San Francisco’s hometown non-sleezy sex-toy store and designed vibrators for women.

August 7: Ruby Winters Jenkins, 74: American soul singer (Make Love to Me, I Will).

August 8: Doris Bohrer, 93: American intelligence operative, was a spy during WW II and the Cold War. She was barely 20 and just 2 years out of Silver Spring’s Montgomery Blair High School when she became an employee of the Office of Strategic Services (the WWII predecessor of the CIA). She started her career as a typist, but by the end of the war she had spied on the Nazis from vantage points in Italy and North Africa and played a role in plotting the Allied Invasions of Sicily and the rest of Italy. When WWII ended and the OSS became the CIA, she went on to Germany for Cold War espionage on the Soviet Union and interviewed German scientists who had been captured, held and interrogated by the Russians. In 1979, she retired as deputy chief of counterintelligence and trained U.S. officers on the methods and tactics of foreign espionage operatives. Her son, Jason P. Bohrer said, “she spied on the spies.”

August 9: Jimmy Levine, 61/62: R&B musician, record producer, who played with Marvin Gaye’s road band and worked as a writer for the Jacksons, Rick James, Teena Marie and eventually formed his own production company (Out Post). Levine had been battling cancer for some time.

August 11: Thomas Steinbeck, 72: novelist and eldest son of John Steinbeck, and later in life, a fiction writer who fought bitterly in a family dispute over his father’s estate died at his home in Santa Barbara, Calif of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to his wife, Gail Knight Steinbeck.

August 11: Glenn Yarbrough, 86: American folk singer and founding member of vocal group The Limeliters and a prolific solo artist died at his home in Nashville, Tenn. after years of declining health.

marion-christopher-barryAugust 14: Marion Christopher Barry, 36: the former DC Mayor’s only son and construction company owner died from what may have been from a drug overdose.

August 14: James Woolley, 49: former Nine Inch Nails Keyboardist, 1993 Grammy winner (Wish). Woolley’s ex-wife Kate Van Buren posted his death to Facebook, the cause of death was not shared.

August 16: John McLaughlin, 89: Conservative commentator and host of a long-running television show that pioneered hollering-heads discussions of Washington politics.

machali-4August 18: Mathali, 20: Queen of Ranthambore and perhaps the most photographed tigress on earth. On June 27, 2003 she challenged and killed a crocodile in her territory. The fierce battle between the two lasted for hours.  It cost her two of her canines. It took place in from of dozens of wildlife enthusiasts. Some of them captured it in their cameras, propelling Machhli to worldwide fame. As she aged, even when she would make a kill, she often lost it to a healthier and younger tiger, and a cataract in her left eye developed, robbing her of her site.

August 19: Lou Perlman, 62: disgraced Backstreet Boys and ’NSYNC svengali who was serving out a 25-year prison term after being convicted of running a half-billion-dollar Ponzi scheme in 2008 died at a federal prison in Miami, Florida.

August 20: Steven Hill, 94: he was best known for playing District Attorney Schiff on Law & Order for many years, but played other versatile characters in theater, films and television. He died at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, according to his wife, Rachel, the cause unknown at the time. He wife said he did suffer from several ailments.

August 29: Gene Wilder, 83: actor, screenwriter, author, Wilder died at his home in Stamford, Conn. from complications from Alzheimer’s Disease, which he suffered with for the past three years.

2016 Obits – January through April

Dec. 31, 2015: Natalie Cole, 65: died from liver virus, Hepatitis C.

Jan. 4: Long John Hunter, 84: American blues guitarist and singer-songwriter, from El Paso who was a great Texas singer/songwriter died at his home in Phoenix, Arizona.

Jan. 4: Red Parker, 84: American football coach (The Citadel, Clemson, Ole Miss) died after battling heart-related illnesses in recent month.

Jan. 4: Craig Strickland: a country music singer was found dead after disappearing while on a hunting trip. His body was found on this date, after last being seen on Dec. 27, 2015. He had gone hunting with a friend who was found drowned. Strickland had swam to shore but succumbed to hypothermia.

Jan. 4: Robert Stigwood, 81: the manager who steered the Bee Gees to massive fame and who also managed Cream, had a partnership with Beatles manager Brian Epstein when the Bee Gees moved from Australia to Britain. His label included Andy Gibb, Eric Clapton and Player. Stigwood also produced several music movies including Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, Saturday Night Fever and Grease.

Jan. 5: Nicholas Caldwell, 71: one of the key members and co-founder of the R&B group The Whispers who had a number of hits including “And the Beat Goes One” and one of my favorites – “Rock Steady” was found dead by his wife at their home in Stockton, CA. Caldwell wrote a lot of the group’s hit songs. He had heart problems in the past and had a pacemaker inserted about a year ago but it’s unclear what led to his death.

Jan. 5: Christine Lawrence Finney, 47: painter and animator (Aladdin, The Lion King, Lilo & Stitch) graduated from Ringling School of Art & Design and worked at Disney Feature Animation for 15 years. In 2006 Christine and her husband made Spartanburg, SC their home and traveled to paint beautiful locations and exhibit their fine art regionally.

pat-harringtonJan. 6: Pat Harrington, Jr., 86: the arrogant and hilarious handyman from One Day at a Time passed away due to complications from a fall and Alzheimer’s disease. His daughter Tresa, wrote “that they were all with him when he died at 11:09pm and that they were all crying, laughing and loving him,” and passed along “never be afraid to tell the people you love, that you love them.”

Jan 7: Richard Libertini, 82: comedic actor who had been acting since the late ’60s died after a two-year battle with cancer. He’s well known for his roles in Awakenings, Fletch and the movie Nell.

Jan. 8: Otis Clay, 74: Hall of Fame R&B artist and longtime Billy Price collaborator died in his hometown of Chicago. He was a 2013 inductee to the Blues Hall of Fame.

Jan. 10: Michael Galeota, 31: former Disney Channel star went to the hospital with abdominal pain. He suffered from hypertension and high cholesterol. He went to the hospital complaining of abdominal pains but left soon after checking in, against doctor’s recommendations.

Jan. 10: David Bowie, 69: Bowie was battling liver cancer prior to his death and passed away two days after his birthday. He had just finished releasing his 25th album, entitled Blackstar. Bowie was also an actor who starred in Just a Gigolo and in the 1986 Labyrinth, among others. His son Duncan Jones, who is a Bafta-winning film director, wrote on Twitter: “Very sorry and sad to say it’s true. I’ll be offline for a while. Love to all.” Here’s the link to the bbc.com obituary: http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-12494821. Unfortunately 2016 seems to be shaping up to be the year that many musicians die.

Jan. 11: Stanley Mann, 87: Oscar-nominated screenwriter who worked on such films as Conan the Destroyer, Damien: Omen II and who received an Oscar nom for his work on William Wyler’s The Collector died at his home in Los Angeles after a long illness.

david-marguliesJan. 11: David Margulies, 78: played the NYC mayor in the Ghostbusters films. He died in NYC after a long illness. The veteran actor also starred as Tony Soprano’s sleazy lawyer, Neil Mink, on The Sopranos and appeared in more than a dozen Broadway shows.

Jan 12: William Needles, 97: Canada’s oldest working actor, died at a hospice in Alliston, Ontario. He appeared in more than 100 productions at Stratford Festival over 47 seasons.

Jan. 13: Brian Bedford, 81: voice of Disney’s 1973 animated Robin Hood died at his home in Santa Barbara.

fergusonJanuary 13: Ferguson, approx. 19: Ferguson was a macaque monkey that had been purchased from an exotic pet dealer in Las Vegas, Nev. In December, 1998, PAWS cofounder, the late Pat Derby, received a phone call from the woman who had purchased the monkey. When she discovered that it was illegal to have a pet monkey in California, she discreetly left him at the mouth of the entrance to PAWS. Ferguson did well at PAWS thanks to a mature resident baboon named Harriet. The two were inseparable, with Harriet loving and caring for Ferguson like he was her own baby. Ferguson died from complications of advanced Cushing’s syndrome. He was surrounded by the love of many, including longtime caregivers, as well as PAWS’ cofounder Ed Stewart and veterinarian Dr. Gai.

Jan 13: Tera Wray, 33: Tera and been in the porn industry since 2006. She married Static-X frontman Wayne Static in 2008 and retired from porn 8-months later. In 2014, her husband was found dead of an accidental overdose and Tera has been struggling singer her husband’s death. Her lawyer, Michael Fattorosi, issued a statement saying, “Tera is once again with the love of her life.” Tera had left a note for her roommate. It’s unclear exactly how she died or if she was found in the same home where her husband, Static was found dead, Nov. 1, 2014 after mixing Xanax and other prescription drugs, with alcohol.

Jan. 13: Lawrence Phillips, 40: two-time college national champion and former NFL running back was found dead in his prison cell at Kern Valley State Prison. He was facing a possible death penalty sentence in the murder of his former cellmate. His death is being investigated as a suicide.

Jan. 13: Jim Simpson, 88: a longtime NBC sportscaster died in Scottsdale, Ariz. following a short illness. He had a successful radio and TV career with ABC, CBS, ESPN and TNT and was inducted into the National Sportscaster and Sportswriters Hall of Fame in 2000.

MovieJan. 14: Alan Rickman, 69: Hans Gruber in Die Hard (he was offered this part two days after arriving in Los Angeles at age 41); the outrageous Sheriff of Nottingham in 1991’s Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves; but to many, Alan Rickman was Professor Severus Snape in the Harry Potter movie franchise. Rickman had been suffering from pancreatic cancer. Daniel Radcliffe wrote that Rickman was “one of the greatest actors I will ever work with…” He directed and starred (as King Louis XIV) in A Little Chaos, a movie about two talented landscape artists who become romantically entangled while building a garden in King Louis XIV’s palace at Versailles. Many of those offering condolences drew parallels between the deaths of Rickman and David Bowie: from the same disease at the same age and in the same week. Here’s the link to his obit from theguardian.com: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jan/14/alan-rickman-giant-of-british-film-and-theatre-dies-at-69

Jan. 14: Rene Angelil, 74l: Celine Dion’s husband, former manager and Canadian music producer, died at his home in Las Vegas. He had discovered Dion when she was 12. He was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1999 and had surgery in 2013.

Jan. 15: Dan Haggerty, 74: best known for his role in The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams on the big screen and small one, Haggerty died from spinal cancer at the St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank.

Jan. 15: Pete Huttlinger, 54: guitar virtuoso, who was once described by Vince Gill as “wickedly gifted” died at Vanderbilt University Medical Center after suffering a stroke. He learned to play the banjo and then fell in the love with the guitar and grew into a remarkable musician who composed dazzling original material. He toured and recorded with John Denver for several years in the 90s and backed LeAnn Rimes and John Oates and appeared on recordings by Denver, Oates, Faith Hill, Jimmy Buffett, among others.

glenn-fryJan. 18: Glen Frey, 67: One of the founding members of the 1970s mega-group The Eagles, who enjoyed much success as a solo artist, died from complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis, pneumonia and intestinal issues. In November he had surgery for intestinal problems and in the last few days, his condition took a turn for the worse. Frey sang many of the Eagles biggest hits, including “Tequila Sunrise,” “Already Gone” and “Take It Easy.” The Eagles were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 and won 6 Grammys. Frey also had a successful solo career in the 1980s. He is survived by his wife Cindy and their 3 children.

Jan. 21: Stephanie Rader, 100: American, undercover spy in Postwar Europe, daughter of Polish immigrants, uneducated laborers who settled in Poughkeepsie, New York, and barely spoke English. It was her immersion in the Polish language and culture that proved critical to her success, against daunting odds, as a U.S. spy in Europe after World War II. She was recruited to the Office of Strategic Services and the Strategic Services Unit of the War Department, precursors to the CIA. However, she was officially employed as a clerk at the U.S. Embassy. In reality she was undercover, an agent whose flawless Polish accent and mannerisms allowed her to move around the Soviet-dominated country with relative ease. At the time of her death, a campaign was underway by members of the OSS Society (a group preserving the spy agency’s legacy) to obtain the Legion of Merit on her behalf. The award – honoring “exceptionally meritorious” service – had been denied her for unknown reasons in 1946.

Jan. 26: Abe Vigoda, 94: best known as Sal in The Godfather and Fish on Barney Miller, his daughter confirmed his passing to the AP stating he died at his home in New Jersey. In 1982, People magazine noted that Vigoda did not attend the Barney Miller wrap party and his death was inaccurately reported which led to a decades-long joke.

Jan. 27: James Garrett Freeman, 35: executed by lethal injection for killing Texas Game Warden Justin Hurst. Approximately 100 game wardens and other law enforcement officers gathered and stood vigil outside the prison and revved their motorcycle engines when Freeman was being put to death. Texas Game Warden Justin Hurst had been a Parks & Wildlife Department employee for 12 years, five as a game warden, and died on his 34th birthday, leaving behind his wife and a 4-month-old son.

Jan. 28: Paul Kantner, 74: guitarist in the 60’s psychedelic rock band Jefferson Airplane and its successor, Jefferson Starship died from a heart attack, of multiple organ failure and septic shock. Jefferson Airplane pioneered what became known as the San Francisco sound in the mid-1960s with such hits as “Somebody to Love” and “White Rabbit.” He is survived by three children: sons Gareth and Alexander and daughter China.

Feb.1: Wasil Ahmad, 11: this 11-year-old boy who was praised for his bravery in leading security forces in battle against the Taliban; who was an expert in the use of an AK-47 and heavy machinery; who saw his father gunned down by the Taliban and who had assumed the head of his family was himself gunned down and shot in the head by militants on motorbikes (cowards so threatened by an 11-year-old boy). Though he was taken to a local hospital, he died of his injuries. The Taliban did claim responsibility for the killing.

maurice-whiteFeb. 3: Maurice White, 74: vocalist and co-founder Maurice White, who co-wrote such hits as “Shining Star,” “Sing a Song” and “September” died in his sleep in Los Angeles. White had been battling Parkinson’s disease since 1992 and his health had been deteriorating in recent month. Because of this, he hadn’t been touring with the group since 1994. He remained active with the business side of the group, however. Here’s a link to the Rolling Stone obit: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/maurice-white-earth-wind-fire-singer-and-co-founder-dead-at-74-20160204

Feb. 4: Katie May, 34: Playboy model, Queen of Snapchat and social media influencer died after suffering a catastrophic stroke. She was reportedly hospitalized earlier in the week after experiencing neck pain which doctors diagnosed as a blocked carotid artery.

Feb. 4: Dave Mirra, 41: a legend in freestyle BMX, with dazzling aerial flips and tricks, X Games Winner (1997, 1999-2002, 2004-200) died in North Carolina from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. Greenville, SC police discovered Mirra sitting in his truck at around 4pm. He had been visiting friends in the area a short time before the incident. He is survived by his wife and two children. He was instrumental in bringing the sport of BMX to the City of Greenville, which is now home to more than 20 professional BMX riders.

Feb. 4: Edgar Mitchell, 85: the sixth man to walk on the moon (one of 12 who have done so). An Apollo 14 astronaut.

Feb. 11: William Vincent Hasenzahl, 49: Will has a long and varied list of credits at imdb.com. He just had that face that belonged in the movies and on TV.  He married his high school sweetheart and they shared 33 extraordinary years together.

Feb. 11: Kevin Randleman, 44: UFC Heavyweight Champion (1999-2000), mixed martial artist died from pneumonia and heart failure. In addition to fighting for UFC he fought for PRIDE, Sengoku and Strikeforce.

Feb. 13: Nathan Barksdale, 54: the Baltimore heroin dealer dramatized in HBO’s The Wire died while serving a term in federal prison in North Carolina. He was in a medical prison in Butner, confirmed by Sean Naron of the Baltimore Health Department. Barksdale ran a heroin-dealing operation in Baltimore in the 1980s and served 15 years in state prison on a battery charge.

scalia-hp-slide-8ut9-master675Feb. 13: Antonin Scalia, 79: U.S. Supreme Court Justice and the leading conservative voice on the high court was found dead at a resort in West Texas. The cause of death was not released. A spokeswoman for the US Marshals Service, which sent personnel to the scene, said there was nothing to indicate the death was the result of anything other than natural causes. Richard A Posner wrote, he was “the most influential justice of the last quarter-century.” He was known to be a champion of originalism, which in Scalia’s hands, led to outcomes that pleased political conservatives, but not always. His approach was helpful to criminal defendants in cases involving sentences and the cross-examination of witnesses. Scalia also disdained the use of legislative history, i.e. statements from members of Congress about the meaning and purpose of laws, in the the judicial interpretation of statutes. He railed against vague laws that did not give potential defendants fair warnings of what conduct was criminal. He was sharply critical of Supreme Court opinions that did not provide lower courts and litigants with clear guidance. Judge Scalia was nominated by President Reagan in 1986 and confirmed by the Senate in a vote of 98 to 0. (Photo caption: Credit Barry Thumma/Associated Press

Feb. 15: Denise Matthews (Vanity), 57: actress (The Last Dragon) who fronted the group Vanity 6 and was known for her collaboration with Prince, and evangelist, died at a hospital in Fremont, California of sclerosis encapsulating peritonitis (an inflammation of the small intestines). She had also battled an addiction to crack in the 90s and after an overdose in 1994, her kidneys were severely damaged causing her to undergo almost daily dialysis treatments.

Feb. 19: Harper Lee, 89: Her long-anticipated second novel, Go Set a Watchman was recently released in 2015, but she was best known for her Pulitzer Prize winning, 1961 novel To Kill a Mockingbird was confirmed dead on Febuary 19. Her nephew said that she died in her sleep at the assisted living facility where she lived.

Feb. 20: Mike McCoy, 62: former Green Bay Packer defensive back who intercepted 13 passes, recovered 5 fumbles and averaged 22.0 yards as a kickoff returner in an 8-year career. No cause of death had been given. His wife Janet stated he had moved to an assisted living center. The couple lived in Thornton, Colorado.

Feb. 20: Peter Mondavi, 101: American Napa Valley wine producing pioneer.

Feb. 25: Tony Burton, 78: a Flint, MI native, was best known for his role as Apollo Creed’s trainer Tony “Duke” Evers in the Rocky film franchise, died in California. Burton had been living in California for over 30 years and was just one of four actors to appear in the first six Rocky movies.

Feb. 25: Mark Young (Pyle), 48: born in Atlanta, Georgia, Young was known under many names. He wrestled for WWE, WCW, CWA, AWA, Stampede Wrestling, Pacific Northwest Wrestling, All Japan Pro Wrestling and countless others.

george-kennedyFeb. 28: George Kennedy, 91: Oscar-winning actor known for playing cops, soldiers and blue-collar figures in films like Cool Hand Luke, Airport and the Naked Gun films died from heart disease.

Feb. 28: Jack Lindquist, 88: child actor and the first President of Disneyland (1990-1993) had been in declining health and was moved to hospice care. He was inducted as a Disney Legend in 1994.

March 3: Gavin Christopher, 66: singer and songwriter, best known for his international smash hit “One Step Closer to You” died of congestive heart failure. Born in Chicago into a musical family, he worked with Chaka Khan, Oscar Brown, Jr., Donny Hathaway and Curtis Mayfield. He joined the band High Voltage with Bobby Watson, Tony Maiden and Lalomie Washburn, who later joined Rufus with Chaka. Christopher may only have been known to some fans for his two big hits as a singer, but he quietly left a much richer legacy of music over four wonderful decades.

March 4: Pat Conroy, 70: author who used his troubled family history as grist for a series of novels including The Price of Tides, The Lords of Discipline and The Great Santini died after a short battle with pancreatic cancer.

nancy-reganMarch 6: Nancy Reagan, 94: former first lady and actress, fierce protector of her husband, spokeswoman of the “just say no” anti-drug campaign, died of heart failure.

March 6: Paul Ryan, 66: comic book artist (Fantastic Four, Superman, Iron Man).

March 8: Sir George Martin, 90: British Hall of Fame record producer (The Beatles), six-time Grammy Award winner; the music producer whose collaboration with The Beatles helped redraw the boundaries of popular music, died, according to his management company.

March 10: Keith Emerson, 71: keyboardist from the progressive rock group Emerson, Lake & Palmer, died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head and his death was ruled a suicide.

March 14: Tamara Grisby, 41: member of the Wisconsin State Assemby (2004-2012) and aide to Joe Parisi died from health complications. She had been previously been treated for an undisclosed form of cancer. Tamara was single and had no children.

March 16: Frank Sinatra, Jr. 72: son of the legendary entertainer, who had a long musical career of his own, died from a heart attack, according to his manager, Andrea Kauffman.

larry-drakeMarcy 17: Larry Drake, 66: best known for playing Benny on L.A. Law, Larry was found dead in his Hollywood home, according to his manager Steven Siebert. In 1988 and 1989, Drake won consecutive outstanding supporting actor Emmys for playing mentally-impaired office worker Benny Stulwicz in L.A. Law. He was also featured in Darkman (1990) and Bean (1997) and had minor roles in episodes of 7th Heaven and Boston Legal.

March 23: Ken Howard, 71: he was Hank Hooper on 30 Rock and also starred in The White Shadow. He was President of SAG/SAG-AFTRA from 2009-2016 and became best known for championing the merger of Hollywood’s two largest actors’ unions, which had a history of not playing well with each other. He had won a Tony and an Emmy.  At the time of his death, no cause was given.

March 24: Garry Shandling, 66: an inventive comedian and star of his own show, Shandling’s comedy and mentorship influenced a generation of comedians. The LAPD stated they had received a 911 call from Shandling’s home saying the comedian suffered from a “medical emergency.” He died later at an LA hospital. Shandling wasn’t known to be suffering from an illness that could have caused his death. He was born in Chicago and raised in Tucson, Ariz. After moving to Los Angeles, he sold a script for Sanford and Sons and also penned scripts for Welcome Back, Kotter. He guest-hosted on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and at one time was considered a Carson replacement. After a serious car accident, he started working on his stand-up routine. In 1986 he created his own sitcom It’s Garry Shandling’s Show, also an early original series effort for Showtime. It was nominated for four Emmys and ran until 1990. He was never married and did not have children.

March 26: Jim Harrison, 78: author and poet, he wrote many books, including Legends of the Fall, which was made into a 1994 movie starring Brad Pitt and Anthony Hopkins. He died at his winter home in Arizona.

March 27: Mother Angelica, 92: American Poor Clare nun, founder of the Eternal Word Television Network, passed away on Easter after a lengthy struggle with the aftereffects of a stroke. In 1981, Mother Angelica launched the EWTN, which today transmits 24-hour-a-day programming to more than 264 million homes in 144 countries. What started with 20 employees has now grown to almost 400.

March 27: Eric Engberg, 74: political correspondent and investigative reporter for CBS, who also covered overseas conflicts and recently won electronic journalism’s top honor for a report identifying a Vietnam veteran buried in the Tomb of the Unknowns, died in his sleep at his home in Palmetto, Florida, where he had retired.

March 28: James Noble, 94: he played Gov. Eugene X. Gatling in the television series Benson. He died from complications of a stroke.

patty-dukeMarch 29: Patty Duke, 69: Star of The Patty Duke Show; Academy Award winner at age 16, when she played Helen Keller in 1962’s The Miracle Worker; President of SAG (1985-1988); played a showbiz hopeful in the 1967 melodrama Valley of the Dolls; won 3 Emmys; played Annie Sullivan in the remake of The Miracle Worker with actress Melissa Gilbert as Keller. She had a difficult childhood with abusive parents and by the time she was 8-years-old, she was under the control of husband-and-wife talent managers who had her working soap operas and advertising displays. Even then they plied her with alcohol and prescription drugs, which accentuated the effects of her undiagnosed bipolar disorder. Duke wrote about her condition and the diagnosis in her 1988 memoir Call Me Anna and of the subsequent treatment that helped stabilize her life. The book became a 1990 TV film in which she starred and it propelled her to become an activist for mental health causes and helped de-stigmatize bipolar disorder.

April 5: Leon Haywood, 74: soul-funk artist, singer-songwriter and producer who was sampled by many artists including Aaliyah, Cam’ron, 50 Cent, Common, J. Cole, Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg. He died in his sleep.

April 6: Merle Haggard, 79: according to Lance Roberts, Haggard’s agent, this country music legend died on his birthday of complications from pneumonia. His workingman voice whose songs “Okie from Muskogee” and “Fightin Side of Me” helped sell millions of records. He recorded more than three dozen No. 1 country hits in a musical career that spanned six decades.

April 7: Blackjack Mulligan, 73: WWE professional wrestler and considered to be one of the toughest competitors of his day, Mulligan served as a US Marine in Guam and played for the NY Jets before gaining fame in the wrestling ring. His signature was all-black cowboy gear – cowboy hat to leather gloves plus his thick western mustache and with this he cut the figure of a dangerous outlaw in the ring and proved it so with his feared iron claw hold.

April 10: Will Smith, 34: a former first-round draft pick who played for the New Orleans Saints’ Super Bowl-winning team was shot to death after a traffic incident. His wife was wounded and taken to a hospital. The shooter is believed to be Cardell Hayes. Smith and his wife were rear-ended by a Hummer H2 causing Smith’s Mercedes Benz SUV to hit a Chevrolet Impala. Smith and the driver of the Hummer (Hayes) exchanged words, at which time he produced a handgun and shot Smith multiple times and his wife twice in the leg. Smith was pronounced dead at the scene.

April 12: Balls Mahoney, 44: professional wrestler and ECW favorite, Jonathan Rechner, aka Balls Mahoney passed away just days after his birthday. Cause of death is still unknown. After a run in Smoky Mountain Wrestling (Boo Bradley) and an infamous appearance in the WWE as the evil Xanta Klaus, Rechner came to prominence as Mahoney and was known for using weapons like his beloved steel chair. While never holding a single title in ECW, he did win the tag title 3 times. He leave behind a son, Christopher.

April 14: Ron Theobald, 72: Milwaukee Brewer second baseman, born in Oakland, Calif. died in Walnut Creek, Calif. stats: http://www.baseball-reference.com/register/player.cgi?id=theoba001ron

April 17: Doris Roberts, 90: She was best known for her role as Marie Barone on Everybody Loves Raymond, one of the best-loved sitcoms in history which earned her seven Emmy nominations and four wins for her colorful characterization. She was a 20-year veteran of the Broadway stage even before she started taking roles in film and on TV during the 1970s. She had that “mom-like” attitude and was at her best playing hard-boiled, gossipy, women who wasn’t too wise about the ways of the world. She worked well past the age of retirement and had a reputation as one of the big and small screen’s iconic mothers. It’s been reported Robert’s died of a massive stroke at her home.

sub-chyna-obit-master768April 20: Chyna (Joan Laurer), 45: former pro wrestler, turned reality TV star, Chyna, who studied Spanish literature and volunteered with the Peace Corps was found dead in her Redondo Beach, California, home. No signs of foul play were found. When her friends were not able to reach her for several days, one went to her home and found her not breathing and called the police. Chyna had publicly battled substance abuse for years. She was born in Rochester, NY in 1969 and graduated from the Univ. of Tampa with a degree in Spanish Literature and was a trainee with the Peace Corps in Costa Rica. She had once contemplated a career in law enforcement. Tho not a fan of the sport, she joined a wrestling school led by Killer Kowalski. “I’d been rejected at everything,” Chyna told The Boston Herald in 1999 describing unsatisfying efforts as a bartender, a saleswoman and a singer. WWE hired her – she could bench-press 350 pounds and at 5’10” tall, weighing 180 lbs, she occasionally took on male competitors. She won the Women’s Championship in 2001 by beating Ivory. She is survived by her mother, sister and brother. NY Times bio: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/22/arts/television/chyna-wrestler-dead.html?_r=0

prince-youngerApril 21: Prince, 57: died from an accidental overdose of fentanyl. Prince won Grammys in 1984, 1986, 2004 and 2007. He won an Oscar in 1984 for Best Music, Original Song Score for Purple Rain. He released his first music in 1978 and went on to sell more than 100 million additional albums. He was a prolific writer, writing his first song when he was seven years old. He not only wrote songs, but he sang, arranged, played multiple instruments and recorded more than 30 albums. He was a musical prodigy, writing, arranging, producing and playing almost all of his own hit records. He wrote more than two dozen rock classics in a five-year flurry with his first band, The Revolution, by his side. Purple Rain, Little Red Corvette, 1999, Raspberry Beret, When Doves Cry, Kiss … and at the same time he wrote Manic Monday for The Bangles and Nothing Compares 2U made famous by Sinead O’Connor. Throughout his long career he had a reputation for being an eccentric (as most geniuses do). In 1993 he changed his name to a symbol and soon became known as “The Artist Formerly Known as Prince.” It was done to protest against Warner Bros. He wanted to own the master tapes of his songs and be allowed to release more material, more often. When relations deteriorated even more, he appeared with the word “Slave” written on his face. He released five more songs, mediocre, as his contract bid him, before leaving Warner Bros., and signed with Arista Records. By the 2000s, he reverted back to his original name. Many experts said that his incredible vocal range hid the fact that he was one of the greatest guitarists of his generation. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, which said he “rewrote the rulebook.” On April 15, 2016 his private plane made an emergency landing in Illinois and he was taken to the hospital. He was treated and released within a few hours. By the following Thursday he would be found unresponsive in the elevator on his estate.

April 21: Michelle McNamara, 46: crime writer who founded the website TrueCrimeStory.com and the wife of popular comedian Patton Oswalt died in her sleep, her husband’s publicist confirmed.

April 24: Billy Paul, 81: died at his home after being hospitalized a week following a cancer diagnosis, according to his manager. Paul is best known for his song “Me & Mrs. Jones.”

April 28: Charles Gatewood, 74: a pioneering photographer of the underground, from documenting the Beats, the dark alleys of 1970s Mardi Gras, to extreme body modification practitioners and sexual fetishists, he was an open-minded photographic anthropologist who decided to end his life by jumping from his third floor balcony.

Mac Users call it The Beach Ball of Death …

That slowly spinning, brightly colored ball, signaling buffering that all of us here at work hate to see when we’re trying to watch a television broadcast or movie clip or whatever.

Yes, I said “watch it here at work.” Now there’s a name for it … ‘buffer rage.’ Oh for crying out loud. Now that you think of it, I did tear up a piece of paper towel into tiny shreds when I was trying to watch the Ben-Hur trailer yesterday but then I just changed the speed and it was fine.

Anyway, read more about ‘buffer rage’ here: http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/0002/half-of-streaming-consumers-experience-buffer-rage-per-ineoquest/278176

Disney Labs Enables Graphical Sports Play

Disney researchers have discovered a way to search sports footage using hand-draw play diagrams. Quite literally … the user draws the play on a “chalkboard” and the technology finds it.

The technology was created in conjunction with STATS and is called Chalkboarding and allows the user to issue queries by drawing a play of interest, very similar to how a coach draws up plays.

“The method is far more effective than keyword searching,” according to Patrick Lucey, director of data science at STATS, who started working on Chalkboarding while a scientist at Disney Research.

Reach the article here: http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/0002/-disney-labs-enables-graphical-search-for-sports-plays/278158

— from Newsbytes from TVTechnology

Criminal Minds – Derek – Stars Danny Glover

The latest episode of Criminal Minds is a study in mind control and how in the face of adversity, you can use disassociation to “save” yourself.

Derek

“Derek” — When Morgan is abducted, the BAU scrambles to find him and save his life. Legendary actor Danny Glover guest stars as Morgan’s father, Hank. Credit: Trae Patton/CBS ©2016 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

At the end of the previous episode, Derek Morgan is kidnapped just as he reaches home. He’s on the phone with his girlfriend, Savannah, and she’s about to tell him some good news when he is attacked.

Derek, the episode which aired Wednesday, March 2, picks up with Derek being unloaded from crates, and strapped to beams via cables. A team of six men in an isolated location stands by taking orders from a man leading the show.

When the leader orders them to “wake him,” they realize Derek is awake but is disassociating himself from the pain that is about to be inflicted on him. After two similar dreams, one involving children, the other involving the team, but ending with Danny Glover sitting in his dining room, Derek’s torture begins with some body shots and his conversation with Danny Glover begins in earnest.

He needs a hint to find out who he is, discovers it’s his Dad, and with the encouragement of his Dad, begins a cognitive interview on himself to discover who and why he’s in this predicament and how he’s going to get out of it.

His next torture is nasty – some kind of flammable gel is applied down the center of his chest and lit, and when that doesn’t phase him to the delight of the leader he orders Derek to be stripped. They cut him loose and as he falls to the ground and his shirt is cut off, Derek makes his break, grabbing one of the guys as a shield and begins shooting at the rest, killing and/or wounding all of them.

Meanwhile Garcia and JJ take Savannah home to pack a bag and do some cyber scouting and Garcia discovers an Intranet in their wireless router. It opens up a page about the CIA which causes JJ to get on the phone immediately to a contact of hers.

While searching for a cell phone on one of the six, now assumed dead, Derek finds one, but it displays “No Signal.” He finds an interesting tattoo and discovers the leader is still alive and encourages him to talk, but all he does is mutter name and serial number gibberish. He realizes he isolated and has no way of contacting anyone to help him.

He and his Dad are now standing next to a body of water, and Derek asks him “why are here?” His father says, “you created this space in your head when you were 15.” “I don’t want to talk about what happened when I was 15,” Derek tells him. Dad tells him he’s very proud of him, which floors Derek. “Proud!” “Yes, Derek,” his Dad says, “Proud you turned your pain into your greatest asset.”

Soon Penelope shows up in his dissassociated state, teetering around in heels among the grass and dirt with a furry halo wired to her, appealing to Derek for help so she can do something to find him. Nothing comes to him immediately, but he remembers the tattoo and in the real world, JJ has returned to headquarters with a picture of a six man team that hires itself out to the highest bidder. Hotch tells Garcia to focus in on the tattoo and they have a clue.

Is this a Walking Dead episode?!?…. no but Derek has heard one of the survivors talking on a satellite phone and when he tries to get it away from him the guy swallows the sim card and Derek’s only option is to gut the guy with a knife and get the card …. which he does. When he gets the phone working it says “enter password” and he proceeds to throw a temper tantrum and just like our friend Garcia his Dad says “let me know when you’re done throwing your temper tantrum” and continues smoking his cigar.

Derek calms himself and says, “okay Dad. Hey is that a Dominican? At work we had this Day of the Dead thing and I left it for you,” and Danny Glover takes a puff and says, “well, I got it.”

Still he’s really stressed as he plays with the phone, his only chance and his fear takes over and briefly they show the aftermath of his death … his photo up on the FBI wall, his team solemnly standing in front of it. As he continues to play with the phone he finds the redial screen and with his Dad talking him through it, he redials the first number ….

Which gets Garcia incredibly excited hoping someone answers it, and someone does, sending everything into motion …. Morgan talking to the man who had him kidnapped, the team heading out to rescue him on helicopters, Garcia going to tell Savannah they know where he is and they’re going to get him.

So the guy shows up and tries to finish the job. Kicks Derek down, takes the knife away and stabs him in the hand. Derek is calling to his Dad, wondering where he is, and Derek plays a little possum so Reed can sneak in the front door and shoot the guy.

But it doesn’t end there. Derek is rescued. So go check OnDemand and watch it for yourself. You’ll really enjoy Danny Glover’s performance as Derek Morgan’s dad.

Thomas Gibson (Hotch) directs this episode.

 

 

Today’s World Wildlife Day …

And the future of Elephants is in our hands.

World Wildlife Da

This year’s focus is on elephants – African and the Asian variety. It’s estimated that 100,000 African elephants were slaughtered for their ivory between 2010 and 2012. Asian elephants are losing their habitat.

There is some progress, but more needs to be done to protect elephants and to stop the illegal trafficking of all wildlife.

Go to http://www.elephanttrust.org and www.elephantvoices.org to find out how you can help.

We Lost Two more magnificient Elephants in 2015

Wanda the Asian Elephant

Wanda

February 12, 2015: Wanda, 57: one of the oldest Asian elephants in North America, Wanda was humanely euthanized at PAWS’ ARK 2000 captive wildlife sanctuary in San Andreas, Calif. following a long history of arthritis and foot disease, the leading cause for the euthanization of captive elephants. Wanda was born in the wild but was captured at a young age to be put on display in the United States. During her lifetime she was moved from one place to another, including Disneyland, a circus, zoos in Texas and then Detroit. In 2005 the Detroit Zoo (a leader in animal welfare as well as providing sanctuary for animals in need of rescue) decided to end its elephant program and opted to relocate Wanda and fellow Asian elephant Winky to PAWS’ ARK 2000. (Winky passed away in 2008.) Another Asian elephant, Gypsy, arrived at the Sanctuary, and it was discovered that they had been in a circus together more than 20 years earlier. They instantly remembered one another and could always be found close together. Even in death, their friendship endured. After Wanda passed away, Gypsy approached her friend, stayed by her side for a period of time, gently touched her body and “spoke” to her in soft rumbles before slowly walking away.

Iringa

Iringa at PAWS

July 22, 2015: Iringa, 46: North America’s oldest African Elephant, who was living at the PAWS sanctuary, was euthanized following a long history of degenerative joint and foot disease. Her favorite time of day was her therapy pool sessions, where she would float, taking the weight off her feet and joints. Her caregivers would feed her special treats. After the session she would immediately go and cover herself in mud, like an elephant would do naturally in the wild. Iringa was born in Mozambique, Africa in 1969 and was captured before she was two years old and sent to the Toronto Zoo in 1974. She was one of seven elephants shipped to the zoo from Mozambique that year; Iringa was the longest-lived elephant from that group. Together with two other elephants named Toka and Thika, who were born at the zoo, Iringa arrived at PAWS in October of 2013 after the Toronto City Council voted to relocate the elephants following the Zoo’s decision to end its elephant program. Toka is 45 and still lives at PAWS.

2015 Obits – Those we lost in 2015 – April thru June

April 1: Robert Walker, 54: Canadian-born American animator and director (Aladdin, Brother Bear, Mulan, The Lion King), was known as a “down-to-earth, quiet, thoughtful guy who cared about the people around him.” He translated his love and passion for drawing into a career as a Walt Disney layout artist and director — a career that culminated with a 2003 Academy Award nomination for the animated feature Brother Bear, a film that earned more than $250 million worldwide. Bob died from a heart attack at age 54, he had recently retired from the film industry.

BRITAIN LENNON

Cynthia Lennon © Alastair Grant.

April 1: Cynthia Lennon, 75:  Cynthia was John Lennon’s first wife and mother of Julian Lennon. Lennon’s former Beatles bandmate, Paul McCartney released a special message in honor of Cynthia, writing, “The news of Cynthia’s passing is very sad. She was a lovely lady who I’ve known since our early days together in Liverpool. She was a good mother to Julian and will be missed by us all; but I will always have great memories of our times together.” Cynthia lost her battle with cancer.

April 2: Linsey Berardi, 22: Bad Girls Club star (Oxygen), Linsey “Jade” Berardi, who was known as “Brooklyn Brat” on the show, reportedly got kicked off the show after getting in a fight with a cameraman. At this time, her cause of death is unknown.

April 2: Tom Towles, 65: a character actor, who was a regular in Rob Zombie films died from a stroke at a hospital in Pinellas, Florida.

April 3: Bob Burns, 64: former Lynyrd Skynyrd drummer died in a single-vehicle wreck along Tower Ridge Road in Cartersville (Bartow County) Georgia. He was not wearing a seatbelt and was the only occupant in the vehicle.

NFL Historical Imagery

Terdell Middleton: ©1980 AP Photo/NFL Photos

 

April 3: Terdell Middleton, 59: American football player (Green Bay Packers) was a running back and attended the University of Memphis during the fall of 1973. He was a third round pick in the 1977 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Cardinals and was traded to Green Bay in the preseason. He went to the Pro Bowl after the 1978 season, when he ran for 1,116 yards, sixth best in the NFL. He was five days short of his 60th birthday when he died.

April 5: Frederic Brandt, 65: Brandt was likely the inspiration for Martin Short’s character on “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” a parody that reportedly DEVASTATED the celebrity doctor. He was found dead in his Miami home on Sunday morning after hanging himself, a spokesperson for the Miami Police Department confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. Some of Brandt’s patients included Madonna and Stephanie Seymour.

April 6: Alton “Ben” Powers, 64: Good Times actor, (Keith Anderson) passed away, cause of death unknown.

April 7: Jose Capellan, 34: former major league pitcher, was found dead from an apparent heart attack at his home in Philadelphia. He apparently was taking Ambien, a drug used for sleep disorders.

April 8: Geoffrey Lewis, 79: had roles in Clint Eastwood movies (High Plains Drifter, Thunderball & Lightfoot, Every Which Way But Loose, Any Which Way You Can, Bronco Billy, Pink Cadillac, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil), plus other films (The Devil’s Rejects, Heaven’s Gate, Dillinger, TV Movie Salem’s Lot, Smile), and numerous television shows (Barnaby Jones, Hawaii Five-O, Lou Grant, Little House on the Prairie, Falcon Crest, Murder She Wrote). Geoffrey was the father of actress Juliette Lewis and he is survived by his wife Paula Hochhalter and nine other children including Lightfield and Matthew, both actors and Dierdre, an actress.

April 9: Alex Soto, 49: A popular Puerto Rican comedian and drag queen, Alex had been recovering from the amputation of his left foot when he suffered a heart attack. He died in Boston. He had previously battled diabetes.

April 10: Eduardo Gauggel Medina, 48 and Eduardo Gaugel Rivas, 70: both Honduran lawyers and politician, the elder Eduardo was also a member of the Supreme Court (1994-1998), the father and son were murdered in Honduras as they were entering Gauggel Rivas’ house in San Pedro Sula by gunman wielding high powered weapons. The son and father died at the scene suffering multiple gunshot wounds. One of the perpetrators was injured in the exchange and authorities arrested him at a clinic in Villa Nueva, 25 kilometers from where the original attack happened.

April 10: Lauren Hill, 19: American college basketball player, pediatric cancer advocate, died of Diffused Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG). People diagnosed with this type of caner are given two years maximum to live. Lauren’s motto was “never give up.”

April 12: Ibrahim Sulayman Muhammad al-Rubaish, 35: Muslim cleric, said to be the religious leader of al-Qaeda in Yemen who had a $5m bounty on his head, has been killed by a US drone strike. It is unclear who launched the air strike. He was released from Guantanamo Bay in 2006, after which he joined al-Qaeda in Yemen.

Marion Warner

Marion C. Warner (courtesy of Havlicek family)

April 12: Marion C. Stroud Havlicek Warner, 92: passed peacefully on April 12, 2015 at the age of 92 of complications from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Marion is survived by her children: Scott R Stroud (deceased), Jeffrey Stroud, Mary-Jo and Annabelle Havlicek. She was preceded in death by her brother Robert Muehlbach and sister Margaret Muehlbach Bauer; and her husbands, James Stroud, Joseph F. Havlicek and Charles W. Warner. She was the loving grandmother to Nick Stroud; Lauren and Jenene Ebstein; Teresa, Scott Robert, James and Holly Stroud; the generous great grandmother to ten and the caring great-great grandmother to three. She was a secretary of the Year recipient and many times Toastmaster’s Speaker Award winner. Marion lived in Stevens Point for almost two decades and worked at Robert’s Irrigation, Joern’s Furniture Company, Inc. and Washington Elementary School. She moved to Milwaukee in the mid-70’s. Marion loved crossword puzzles, murder mysteries, shopping, jewelry, shoes and tiramisu. She was my mother.

 

April 14: Percy Sledge, 73: best known for his hit “When a Man Loves a Woman,” died at his Baton Rouge, Louisiana home after a long battle with cancer. His career spanned 50 years.

Homaro Cantu

Homaro Cantu

April 14: Homaro Cantu, 38: American chef, suicide by hanging, was found on Chicago’s Northwest Side. He was found in the brewery he was planning to open in the summer in Old Irving Park. Cantu was a culinary innovator on many levels.

 

 

April 14: Kevin Rosier, 53: American super heavyweight kickboxing champion and mixed martial artist (UFC), was one of the first men to ever step into the UFC Octagon. Rosier, who took part in the UFC 1 tournament in 1993 was ill for quite some time, suffered an apparent fatal heart attack.

April 15: Joseph A Bennett, 44: British actor (The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, The Bill) and husband to Julie Graham, was found hanging in Richmond Park, SW London. Bennett met Graham when they were in a play together and they married in secret.

April 16: Johnny Kemp, 55: born August 2, 1959, Kemp started singing in Bahamian nightclubs at age 13. He moved to New York in 1979 with the band “Kinky Fox.” He is well known for his hit “Just Got Paid.” He died after falling and hitting his head on a rock on the beach in Jamaica. Reportedly he was to join the Tom Joyner Morning Cruise. He is survived by his wife Deidre and their two sons. Enjoy the video, it will have you out of your seats … (below)

April 18: Joseph Lechleider, 82: was father of the DSL Internet Technology.

April 19: Freddie Gray, 25: police suspect in Baltimore. Six police officers were suspended after Freddie Gray died from a severed spinal cord after being chased and arrested.

Betty Willis

Betty Willis

April 19: Betty Willis, 91: the American graphic designer who created the “Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign along Interstate 15 that has served as a gateway to the city since 1959 died of natural causes at the home of her daughter in Las Vegas. She was born in Overton, Nevada and when she was about 2-weeks old, her father moved the family to Las Vegas. She also designed the sign for the fabled Moulin Rouge Hotel. Though the building was destroyed in a series of fires, the sign was saved and moved to the Neon Museum in 2009. In addition to her daughter, Willis is survived by two grandchildren and a great grandchild.

 

April 21: Cindy Yang, 24: model, and entertainer Cindy Yang (Peng Hsin-yi) committed suicide in her Taichung residence by reportedly inhaling helium, leaving behind a suicide note, blaming coworkers and bullying on the Internet. Fans of “Cindy Yang” and of the TV show “University” pointed to a Facebook page also saying that bullying led her to take her own life. Police said that Peng’s suicide note mentioned Internet “haters” and colleagues as being the reason for her suicide.

April 23: Richard Corliss, 71: longtime film critic for Time magazine, and autor of three books, including Talking Pictures. He died under hospice care in New York City after suffering a stroke.

April 23: Paul Ryan, 69: Actor, TV Host and correspondent (Entertainment Tonight) died from leukemia at Providence Saint Joseph Hospital in Burbank. He acted, he interviewed celebrities, he was a TV hosting coach, speaker and even hosted Celebrity Master Class for the SAG Foundation.

sawyer_sweeten

Sawyer Sweeten

April 23: Sawyer Sweeten, 19: the actor from Everybody Loves Raymond died from a suspected suicide (gunshot). He was 19 (photo is from 2010). He was only weeks from his 20th birthday. He was visiting his family in Texas where it is believed to have shot himself on their front porch.

 

April 24: Sabeen Mahmud, 39: Pakistani human rights activist, was shot dead in Karachi via a drive-by shooting after hosting a talk on allegations of torte in the province of Balochistan. She was driving home with her mother, who was also attacked. Ms. Mehmud was a director of the charity The Second Floor, also known as T2F.

April 25: notable deaths consequent to the 2015 Nepal earthquake: Dan Fredinburg, 33, American executive, head of privacy at Google; Mattias Kuhle, 67, German geographer.

jayne_meadows_allen

Jayne Meadows-Allen

April 26: Jayne Meadows-Allen, 95: legendary actress, award winner on stage and screen, born to missionary parents in China, died peacefully of natural causes in her Encino, Calif. home. Meadows-Allen was in the entertainment industry for more than six decades, from Broadway roles to TV roles. She was also a panelist on the CBS hit program, I’ve Got a Secret. During her run on the show, Jayne was the highest rated actress on CBS, second only to Lucille Ball. Winner of countless awards, Int’l Platform Association Award, Susan B. Anthony Award and many more. Jayne’s husband of 46 years, Steve Allen, the first host of The Tonight Show, passed away in 2000. Their son, Bill Allen states that she was immediately charmed by him when they met, even saying to her sister, Audrey Meadows, “If that man isn’t married soon he will be … and to me.”

 

April 27: Verne Gagne, 89: professional wrestler, trainer and promoter (AWA); wrestling legend and Wrestling Observer first year Hall of Famer had suffered from dementia for many years, which included a 2009 incident where he threw down a fellow nursing home resident. Gagne was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s (or possibly chronic traumatic encephalopathy caused by a lifetime of head injuries) and had been living in the “memory-loss” section at a Bloomington, Minn. health care facility. He continued to make public appearances in his last years, aided by his son Greg. He was 89 when he died.

April 27: Andrew Lesnie, 59: Australian cinematographer (The Lord of the Rings, I Am Legend, The Water Diviner), Oscar winner (2002), died from a heart attack.

Nigel-Terry-as-King-Arthu-009

Nigel Terry

April 30: Nigel Terry, 69: an English actor who starred as King Arthur in John Boorman’s 1981 medieval drama Excalibur died of emphysema. (Blogger’s Note: When I first saw Boorman’s “Excalibur” I watched it at least once a week for almost a year, I was that hypnotized by Nigel Terry’s performance.) Terry also played in Anthony Harvey’s The Lion in Winter. In 1986 he played a bisexual voluptuary with a goatee and a gleaming eye in Caravaggio opposite Sean Bean and Tilda Swinton. He also worked in theatre (the National Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company), often working with director Max Stafford-Clark and playwright Howard Barker. In his last major film, Wolfgang Petersen’s Troy (2004) an epic starring Brad Pitt and Orlando Bloom, he had the pleasure of playing a Trojan high priest and advisor to O’Toole’s King Priam. In 1993 in moved from London back to Cornwall partly to be near his parents in their later years, but also to enjoy the beauty of the cliffs and sea.

 

April 30: Ben E King, 76: soul and R&B singer, best known for his iconic 1961 single “Stand by Me,” died from coronary heart disease. Though he gained some fame with The Drifters, it was the classic Stand By Me that cemented his fame.

May 1: Dave Goldberg, 47: Silicon Valley entrepreneur, SurveyMonkey chief executive and husband of Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg was found lying next to a gym treadmill at a holiday resort in Mexico. Goldberg died of severe head trauma. He had vital signs when he was discovered, but later died at a hospital.

May 1: Grace Lee Whitney, 85: born in Detroit, Mich., she is best known for her Star Trek character, Yeoman Janice Rand of the U.S.S. Enterprise. Whitney passed away peacefully in her Coarsegold home.

Michael Blake

Michael Blake accepts his Oscar in 1991 as Doris Leader Charge translates his speech into the Sioux language.

May 2: Michael Blake, 69: author and Oscar-winning screenwriter of Dances With Wolves (he adapted the screenplay from his own novel), died peacefully after a lengthy illness in Tucson, Ariz. His novel sold more than 3.5 million copies and was translated into 15 languages. The 1990 film won seven Oscars. He is survived by his wife Marrianne and his three children.

May 2: Philip S. Goodman, 89: director, screenwriter and producer, who wrote for film and TV, died at his home in New York City. He wrote episodes for TV shows such as Profiles in Courage, Alfred Hitchcock Presents and Johnny Staccato. He directed the 1963 feature We Shall Return. He also wrote and directed television documentaries and industrial films for many years. In 1970 he wrote three episodes of National Educational Television’s “Our Vanishing Wilderness,” one of the first series on TV to focus on environmental issues. He also directed TV commercials for Coca-Cola, RCA, Revlon and Rheingold beer, among others. He is survived by his daughter Jody (a lawyer); a son Nicholas (a film producer); and two grandchildren.

May 4: William Bast, 84: wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two James Dean bios, died of complications from Alzheimer’s.

© ellen-albertini-dow

Ellen Albertini Dow Credit: Erik Pedersen

May 4: Ellen Albertini Dow, 101: whose memorable take on “Rapper’s Delight” stole the show in the 1998 Adam Sandler movie The Wedding Singer – and whose screen career started in her 70s. She died at the age of 101 from pneumonia.

 

May 4: Joshua Ozersky, 47: the prominent American food writer and a Portland resident, died of drowning after suffering a seizure in his Chicago hotel, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office. He was in Chicago to attend the James Beard Foundation Awards.

May 5: Gerard “Jock” Davison, 47: a former Belfast IRA commander and the most senior pro-peace process republican killed since the 1997 IRA ceasefire was shot dead, once in the back of the head in front of children going to a local primary school in the Markets area of south Belfast at 9am.

May 6: Guy Carawan, 87: a folk singer and political activist, introduced the song “We Shall Overcome” to the US civil rights movement.

May 7: Gilbert Lewis, 79: a character actor who played the kindly King of Cartoons on the first season of Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, died at  home peacefully in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

May 8: Joanne Copeland, 83: the second wife of Johnny Carson and a confidante of Truman Capote, died at her longtime home in Los Angeles. She had been in declining health and was in hospice care. She married Johnny Carson in 1963 and divorced him in 1972 when she became a confidante to Truman Capote. Capote even kept a writing room at her house, where he died in 1984. Joanne Carson had a second marriage later in life to Richard Rever that also ended in divorce.

elizabeth wilson

Elizabeth Wilson in “The Graduate”

May 9: Elizabeth Wilson, 94: a character actress of stage, screen and TV, Wilson has over 70 appearances to her credit. Special acknowledgment of her work in The Graduate, 9 to 5, The Incredible Shrinking Woman, The Addams Family and an episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent. She was a Tony Award Winner.

May 11: Isobel Varley, 77: the world’s most tattooed female pensioner has died following a battle with Alzehimer’s disease. She was covered 93% with designs. Despite receiving her first tattoo in her late 40s, she went on to claim Guinness World Record for “most tattooed senior citizen (female)” and appeared in magazines, newspapers and advertisements across the globe.

May 12: Tony Ayala, Jr., 52: San Antonio boxer died from cardiac arrest. SAFD was dispatched to his home where they found him unresponsive. During his career he was 22-0 with 19 knockouts before he was convicted of rape and served 16 years in prison. He returned to prison in 2004 for parole violation and served another 10 years. He was the son of legendary trainer Tony Ayala, Sr., who died last year. His brothers, Mike, Sammy and Paulie all box on the amateur and pro levels.

May 12: John Colenback, 79: he played Dr. Dan Stewart on the defunct CBS soap opera As The World Turns and appeared in the original Broadway production of A Man for All Seasons. He died of complications from COPD according to his nephew. Other survivors include his brother and nieces and nephews.

May 12: Rachel Jacobs, 39: an American entrepreneur, who was thought to be missing after the 2015 Philadelphia Amtrak derailment was discovered dead from her injuries. She was CEO of ApprenNet and also co-founder of the non-profit Detroit-Nation. Her mother is former Michigan State Senator Gilda Z. Jacobs. Rachel leaves behind a husband and 2-year-old son.

MacDonald Serial Killer

William MacDonald

May 12: William MacDonald, 90: Australian serial killer known as “The Mutilator,” MacDonald was New South Wales oldest and longest-serving prisoner. He was jailed for life in 1963 for murdering four men in Sydney and 1 in Brisbane. He gained notoriety for slicing off his victims’ genitals.

May 12: Saulat Mirza: Pakistani convicted murderer and political activist was executed by hanging at Machh jail for the murder of former KESC managing director Shahid Hamid, his driver and guard in 1997.

May 13: Gill Dennis, 74: co-writer of the screenplay for Walk The Line and the man who also penned Return to Oz (1985) and did the teleplay for the 1996 TNT Western Riders of the Purple Sage died of an apparent heart attack at his home in Portland, Ore. according to his wife, Kristen.

May 14: B.B. King, 89: King of the Blues, blues legend who was the idol of generations of musicians and fans alike died at his home in Las Vegas. His attorney, Arthur Williams, Jr. said that King told him he wanted his funeral to be held in a church in Indianola, Mississippi, near the site where he worked picking cotton as a boy. King’s eldest surviving daughter, Shirley King of Oak Park, Illi. said she was upset that she didn’t have a chance to see her father before he died. King was a 15-time Grammy winner and continued to perform well into his 80s. His health had been declining during the past year and he had collapsed during a concert in Chicago last October; King blamed it on dehydration and exhaustion. He had been in hospice care at his Las Vegas home. During his career spanning nearly 70 years he was a mentor to scores of guitarists including Eric Capton, Otis Rush, Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix, John Mayall and Keith Richards. King recorded more than 50 records and toured the world, performing 250 or more concerts a year. Singer Smokey Robinson praised the music legend. “The world has physically lost not only one of the greatest musical people ever but one of the greatest people ever. Enjoy your eternity,” Robinson said.

May 15: Corey Hill, 36: former UFC fighter died at a hospital in Tampa, Fla. He apparently suffered a collapsed lung and a heart attack. He is survived by his wife Lauran and three children.

May 15: Valentina Maureira, 14: Chilean euthanasia advocate with cystic fibrosis whose heartbreaking request on YouTube to be allowed to end her own life was refused by the president of Chile died of her illness. Millions of people watched her YouTube video but her public plea was rejected by the Chilean government. Her brother also died of cystic fibrosis at age six.

Washington Redskins 2014 Football Headshots

Adrian Robinson

May 16: Adrian Robinson, 25: American football player, former NFL linebacker from Temple University who played 6 games with the Denver Broncos in 2013, died in Philadelphia. The death was ruled a suicide by hanging. He later played for the Chargers and Redskins. In April he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League.

May 16: Abu Sayyaf: Tunisian senior ISIS commander, head of oil operations, killed during a daring U.S. Special Operations raid in eastern Syria. He was killed in a heavy firefight after he resisted capture in the raid at al-Omar.

May 17: Chinx Drugz, 31: American rapper, murdered in a drive by shooting, a member of French Montana’s Coke Boys. It happened in Queens, NY.

May 17: Michael Kandel, 47: American hip-hop musician (aka Tranquility Bass) who recorded ambient and trip hop music. A cause of death is not known.

Screening of the TNT Original Movie "Hope"

Mary Ellen Trainor Credit: Erik Pedersen

May 20: Mary Ellen Trainor Zemeckis, 62: who appeared in every Lethal Weapon film, played the mother in Goonies, played Elaine in Romancing the Stone and was in many other films died from pancreatic cancer at her home in Montecito, Calif. She moved to Los Angeles in 1980, where she married director Robert Zemeckis and discovered her calling as an actress. She and Zemeckis divorced in 2000; she is survived by her son Alex; her mother, Jane; and siblings Ned, Jack, Barbara and Carolyn.

May 22: Marques Haynes, 89: American Hall of Fame, Harlem Globetrotter Great was known for his remarkable ability to dribble the ball and keep it away from defenders. According to the 1988 Harlem Globetrotter film Harlem Globetrotters: Six Decades of Magic, Haynes could dribble the ball as many as six times a second. He died in Plano, Texas of natural causes.

May 23: John Carter, 87: a diverse actor who had roles on stage and screen died from pneumonia. After graduating college in Missouri he moved to New York to pursue his dream of becoming an actor and married Barbara Williams (also an actor). After they divorced he moved to Los Angeles and became very busy in the world of television and film. He became a Theater West member and met his future wife, Kendall Fewel, a match made in heaven. His roles in television included Winds of War, Roots, Dallas, and Law & Order. Film work included Hoax, Badlands and Joe Kidd.

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Anne Meara

May 23: Anne Meara, 85: comedian and actress, one half of Stiller & Meara and mother of Ben Stiller, she was married to Jerry Stiller for 61 years and worked together almost as long. In addition to her son, she is also survived by her daughter, Amy Stiller and grandchildren.

May 24: Marcus Belgrave, 78: a famous jazz trumpeter who shared the stage and studio with Ray Charles, Joe Cocker, Dizzy Gillespie and Aretha Franklin died of heart failure.

May 24: Michael Ryan, 66: an inmate on death row for the 1985 cult killings of two people including a 5-year-old boy died in custody at the Tecumseh State Correctional Institution in southeast Nebraska. Ryan was convicted for the torture and killing of 26-year old James Thimm at a farm near Rulo (Nebraska) where Ryan led a cult, and in the beating death of Luke Stice, the 5-year-old son of a cult member.

May 26: Paula Cooper, 45: convicted murderer and once the youngest death row inmate in U.S. was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound in northwest Indianapolis. She had been released from prison two years ago after the Indiana Supreme Court set aside her death sentence and gave her a 60-year prison term instead.

May 27: Cotton Coulson, 63: filmmaker and photographer for National Geographic died in Norway after losing consciousness on a scuba dive off the coast of Norway. The dive was part of a 17-day National Geographic expedition. “Most of us divide time between family and career,” said Ford Cochran, director of programming for National Geographic Expeditions. “They found a way to mingle those things, doing the things they loved.”

May 27: Michael King, 67: television distributor who with his brother transformed a modest company they inherited from their father, into a syndicator of television megahits like The Oprah Winfrey Show, Dr. Phil, Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy, died from a lingering infection.

May 27: William Newman, 80: was a character actor that provided him with countless roles in TV and film. He made his film debut in Brubaker and followed this up with The Postman Always Rings Twice. He also appeared in Stephen King’s Silver Bullet and George A. Romero’s Monkey Shines. During the 90s he appeared in Leprechaun, Mrs. Doubtfire, The Stand, The Craft, Touch and two films with Skeet Ulrich. He was also a familiar face on TV. Newman died after a prolonged struggle against the vascular affliction, Multi-infarct Dementia. He died at Hayes Manor Senior Residence in Philadelphia.

May 28: Reynaldo Rey, 75: longtime actor with TV and movie credits died from complications of a stroke he suffered late last year. Rey also had a career as a stand-up comedian and had served as a co-host on BET’s stand-up show Comic View. He had recorded 3 comedy albums and 3 videos.

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Betsy Palmer who is best known for playing Mrs Voorhees in Friday the 13th

May 29: Betsy Palmer, 88: a veteran character actress who achieved lasting fame as the murderous camp cook in the horror film Friday the 13th died of natural causes at a hospice care center in Connecticut. In addition to films, Palmer had appeared on Broadway and in TV shows for decades before she played Mrs. Voorhees in Friday the 13th. She would say in later years that she only took the role because she wanted the money to buy a new car. Palmer is survived by her daughter, Melissa Merendino.

May 30: Jim Bailey, 77: a self-proclaimed “character actor” who did impersonations of female celebrities like Barbra Streisand, Judy Garland and Peggy Lee died from a heart attack due to complications from pneumonia.

May 30: Beau Biden, 46: Attorney General of Delaware and son of US Vice President Joe Biden, died after a battle with brain cancer.

May 30: Julie Harris, 94: British costume designer, who designed the clothes worn by The Beatles in the films A Hard Day’s Night and Help! and James Bond in the film Live and Let Die. Harris died in Westminster Hospital in London from a chest infection, according to her close friend, Jo Botting. Ms. Botting stated, “In a career that embraced more than 80 films and television productions … Julie worked with some of the greatest international stars.” She won an Oscar for costume design in the 1965 movie Darling. Ms. Harris never married or had children. She is survived by her god-daughter, Serena Dilnot.

June 1: Katherine Chappell, 29: American tourist, was a visual effects editor at  production company Scanline and helped create effects for the hit series Game of Thrones. She was attacked and killed by a lioness in South Africa. Apparently the animal approached the passenger side of the car and bit her through the window. Witnesses told park officials that the windows were down. There were numerous signs warning visitors to keep windows up.

June 2: Anthony Riley, 28: a vivacious street performer and a frontrunner on the 2015 season of The Voice who inspired one of the fastest four-chair turnaround in the series’ history apparently took his life. He mysteriously and abruptly left The Voice before the Knockout Rounds with no explanation other than “personal reasons.” It was later revealed that he’d dropped out in January to enter a two-week rehab program for substance abuse.

June 4: Hermann Zapf, 96: German typeface designer (Optima, Palatino, Zapfino).

©Vincent Bugliosi

Vincent Bugliosi © Getty Images

June 6: Vincent Bugliosi, 80: Attorney and author of Helter Skelter, was the man who prosecuted Charles Manson and the members of his “family” for seven murders. The book about the Manson case became one of the best-selling true crime books of all time. Bugliosi died after a years-long battle with cancer, his son, Vincent Bugliosi, Jr. revealed to Retuers.

Christopher-Lee

Sir Christopher Lee

June 7: Sir Christopher Lee, 93: British actor (Dracula, The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars), voice artist and singer. He died at London’s Chelsea and Westminster Hospital after suffering heart and respiratory problems. His career spanned more than half a century. He defined the macabre for a generation of horror film enthusiasts and played the sinister vampire Dracula no fewer than nine times in productions from 1958 through 1973. He was 6’4″ tall so he was an ideal candidate to play the bloodsucking Count. After playing Dracula for 20 years he tired of the role and moved to the United States where he enjoyed a lucrative career in both films and TV mini-series. He made some comedies in the mid-80s and into the 90s and was Count Dooku in Star Wars: Episode II and Episode III and Saruman in Lord of the Rings. He is survived by his Danish wife, Birgit and their daughter Christina.

June 7: Sean Pappas, 49: South African golfer, born on Feb. 19, 1966, died of a heart attack. He is survived by his wife Sue, their 7-year old daughter and a 20-year old son from a previous marriage.

June 7: Cole Tucker (born Rick Karp), 61: Gay porn star died of AIDS-related illness.

June 9: Pumpkinhead (born Robert Alan Diaz), 39: American rapper from New York’s rap scene, died in a New Jersey hospital while waiting to undergo a gall stone surgery. The cause of death has not been disclosed.

June 12: Rick Ducommun, 62: Canadian actor (The ‘Burbs, Scary Movie, Groundhog Day, Die Hard), complications from diabetes.

June 14: John Carroll, 73: newspaper editor (The Los Angeles Times, The Baltimore Sun), who reinvigorated the LA Times and restored the reputation and credibility of the paper in the early 2000s, even as he fought bitterly with the paper’s cost-conscious corporate parent, died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare neurological disorder. He is survived by three siblings, two daughters and three stepchildren.

Blaze Starr

Blaze Starr

June 15: Blaze Starr, 83: Burlesque dancer and the performer who brought a playful version of stripping that combined the flair of an entertainer with the attitude of a satirist died at a hospital in Williamson, West Virginia. As a successful businesswoman she owned the 2 O’Clock Club on East Baltimore Street and appeared in an advertising campaign for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. She was born Fannie Belle Fleming and in the late-1950s had an affair with Louisiana Gov. Earl Long which turned into the 1989 movie Blaze starring Lolita Davidovich and Paul Newman. Ms. Starr had a cameo in the movie. Ms. Starr is survived by her sister, a brother and four other sisters.

June 17: Nelson Doubleday, Jr., 81: American publisher (Doubleday) and Major League Baseball team owner (New York Mets).

June 18: Ralph J. Roberts, 95: American businessman, founder of Comcast.

June 18: Jack Rollins, 100: American film producer (Annie Hall, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Irrational Man).

June 18: Jim Vandiver, 75: American racing driver.

June 18: Danny Villanueva, 77: American football player (LA Rams, Dallas Cowboys) and broadcasting executive, co-founder of Univision. Died from complications from a stroke.

June 19: Earl Norem, 91: American comic book artist (Silver Surfer, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe).

June 20: JoAnn Dean Killingsworth, 91: American actress and dancer, first person to play Snow White at Disneyland. Died from cancer.

June 21: Cora Combs, 92: American professional wrestler.

June 21: Juan José Estrada, 51: was a Mexican boxer in the Super Bantamweight division. He was a onetime WBC International and the WBA Super Bantamweight Champion. He was stabbed to death in what is believed to be a family dispute.

June 21: Darryl Hamilton, 50: American baseball player (Milwaukee Brewers). The bodies of Hamilton and Monica Jordan, 44, were found inside the house in Pearland (Houston). The woman (Jordan) who police believe shot and killed Hamilton and then herself pled guilty to arson in 2008 in a case where she believed her husband at the time was cheating on her. In the Hamilton shooting, police where sent to the home on a 911 call about a disturbance. When they arrived they found his body near the front entrance. Her body was found in another part of the house. The home was apparently owned by Jordan. Investigators said it appeared Hamilton has been shot more than once; Jordan died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The couples 13-month old boy was found unharmed in the home.

June 22: James Horner, 61: American composer (Titanic, Field of Dreams, Braveheart, Apollo 13), Oscar winner (1998), died while piloting a single-engine S312 Tucano turboprop plane when it crashed into a remote area about 60 miles north of Santa Barbara.

June 22: Buddy Landel, 53: American professional wrestler (SMW, USWA, WCW). An east Tennessee wrestling legend, “Nature Boy” Landel died in Virginia. He was a Knoxville, Tenn. native.

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Dick Van Patten © Everett Collection

June 23: Dick Van Patten, 86: American actor (Eight Is Enough, Spaceballs, Robin Hood: Men in Tights, The Love Boat), died due to complications from diabetes at Saint John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. He is survived by his wife Patricia Van Patten to whom he was married for more than 60 years, and three sons.

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Deer Island Jane Doe

June 25: Deer Island Jane Doe, 3-5: American unidentified decedent. The Facebook post has generated over 24 million views but the cause of death remains undetermined and her identity is still unknown. The girl was discovered June 25 in a trash bag by a woman walking a dog. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children used autopsy photos to create a computer-generated image of the girl, believed to be about 4 years old and white or Hispanic.

June 25: Patrick Macnee, 93: English-American actor (The Avengers, This Is Spinal Tap, A View to a Kill). Patrick Macnee played John Steed in the 1960s TV series The Avengers. It might not have made it to a second season if not for Macnee who breathed life into John Steed. It turned out that The Avengers was one of the first British programs to do well in America. The Avengers ran for 9 seasons plus a lame sequel in the mid-70s. He went on to do more TV and movies and publish a candid autobiography in 1988, Blind in One Ear. He was married three times, twice divorced. His last predeceased him. He is survived by his children. Blogger’s comment: Though I try to keep my comments to a minimum, The Avengers was one of the shows I watched religiously when I was growing up.

June 26: Damion Cook, 36: American football player (Detroit Lions), a former NFL lineman who played seven seasons died after suffering a heart attack. He was a Nashville native.

June 26: Richard Matt, 49: convicted murderer and prison escapee; one of two who engineered an elaborate escape from New York’s largest prison, was shot and killed by a federal agent ending a 3-week manhunt that spread over the state’s northern terrain.

June 26: Michelle Watt, 38: British TV presenter (60 Minute Makeover) suicide.

June 28: Raymond Kassow, 70: convicted murderer, bank robber, and the last of 3 convicts in the 1969 Ohio murders has died in custody. On Sept. 24, 1969 Lillian Dewald was working as a teller at Cabinet Supreme Savings and Loan Association in Delhi Township, Ohio. John L. Leigh, Raymond Kassow and Watterson Johnson came in to rob the place. Three customers (Helen Huebner and sisters Luella and Henrietta Stitzel) walked in moments later. The men forced all four women into the vault and shot them until they ran out of bullets. The men escaped with $275. Helen Huebner’s husband Joe, who had been waiting outside for her, discovered the homicides. John L. Leigh died in prison in 2000. Watterson Johnson died in prison in 2014.

Glenn FordJune 29: Glenn Ford, 65: Ford was exonerated last year after spending nearly 30 years of his life on death row for a crime he did not commit. The Innocence Project of New Orleans announced he died of lung cancer, surrounded by friends and family. In 1984 he was convicted and sentenced to die for the Nov. 5 death of a Shreveport jeweler.

June 29: Jackson Vroman, 34: a former Iowa State basketball player and resident of Los Angeles county was found dead in the pool of his home.